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Join Liberty.me today for FREE! by Joey Clark and J. S. Diedrich When we are born, our minds are free. The concept of th

Politics and the Age of Decentralization

  Going out with my three kids during a morning on a regular week day could get me into trouble, annoying questions

One of the most baffling phenomena in the modern world is the gullibility of that small class of people who regard thems

Dear Trump Nation, I made a promise to myself before the beginning of the 2016 Presidential cycle that I would not suppo

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  • Ross Milburn‘s article Libertarianism Blocked by Jargon has a new comment 1 minute ago

      Libertarianism is the only major theory of social organization that has not been discredited by its practical application. Libertarianism is based on the easily understood and morally crucial non-aggression [Read story]
    • Hi Ross,

      “Libertarianism is the only major theory of social organization that has not been discredited by its practical application.”

      That’s because libertarianism has never been applied. It really cannot be, because it really is not a theory of social organization.

      “Let’s start with the common libertarian desire to ‘abolish the state.'”

      Is that “the common libertarian desire?” I think a lot of libertarians would disagree with that. I thought it was the anarchist’s desire to abolish the state. But that would not be a social organization, it but lack of one, wouldn’t it?

      “Today’s students naturally describe our current economic system as capitalism, but this system is only one form of the market, comprising the “mixed economy,” which is a halfway house between totalitarian communism and the actual free market.”

      That’s true.

      “… one universal form of law for the human species, controlled only by direct democracy of the global population, is essential.”

      That’s the communist dream. Are you sure you’re a libertarian?

      “My conclusion is that, if we want to create a libertarian movement that will spread virtue through societies, just as the most successful (and immoral) creeds once did, we should replace the ambiguous political jargon with popular descriptions of the actual benefits of a free society, headed by slogans that can excite the passions of the general population.”

      The problem is the, “general population,” which is never going to be moved by any slogans except those that promise, “security for everyone,” “free medicine for everyone,” “free education for everyone,” and “safety for everyone.” Nobody wants the libertarian message of individual freedom:

      “What? Be totally responsible for my own life, not having any more of anything than I can actually earn by my own effort. If I want to be educated, have health care, a car, a home, a good reputation and always know I’m safe I have to earn them myself? Buzz off, Libertarian.”

      Sorry! It won’t work.

    • Hi Randall,
      Thanks for your interesting comments!
      First, you state: “Libertarianism is not a theory of social organization.” Libertarians today adhere to the non-aggression principle, which prohibits the initiation of force in any context (but not the 2nd use of force in self-defense, or social restitution). In contrast, governments are based on military conquest and everything they do is supported by armed force. If humans adopted libertarianism, they would still have leaders, but if any leader used or threatened force, he or she would be regarded as a criminal. Thus humans would interact on a voluntary, contractual basis, and that would transform all societies for the better – so it would greatly change social organization. Incidentally, for your enlightenment, anthropologists stress that voluntarist organization was universal among hunter-gatherers before agriculture, so libertarianism is the only biologically natural form of social organization.

      Second, libertarians that reject the initiation of force must reject its use by the armed state, and therefore they must reject the state. You’re right that some “libertarians” would disagree, but they are fringe groups who simply believe in “more liberty than we have now” – they are not actual libertarians according to the most common definition, as above. Note that libertarians demand the rule of law – without law, you cannot have markets, and markets replace force in a free libertarian society. Anarchists, in contrast, tend to reject the rule of law. (We don’t need a coercive state to have laws – but I expect you realized that already?).

      Third, you agree with me on capitalism – well done, you’re a gentleman!

      Fourth, I support one universal law. Well, as I have stated, if we want to live in a society where people are free to interact by contract rather than force, then law is essential. Surely you do not support Moslem laws in one country, Hindu laws in another, Jewish law in a third? That would be silly! You know that the rules that we call “law” started from families, and moved to larger jurisdictions, such as tribes, cities, nations – what is the next step? It is the “law of the human species” – it would comprise only a few laws, based around the non-aggression principle. I agree that communists also support international law – they had to get something right! I don’t think that a smart man such as yourself can waste time trying to justify different law for different people (unless you’re a secret masochist).

      Fifth, your final argument is a little cynical, although stylishly satirical, so I assume that you are still youthful. If you travel the world you will find that all peoples have a deep well of longing to live in a moral society that treats people as equals. Humans are naturally bold and self-reliant, just as they are intelligent and moral. Under the brute force, and the sophisticated manipulation, of power-hungry politicians who act as “tax-farmers,” we may become passive and helpless, or cynical. But political parasitism is a disease that arose with warfare, and you and I should aim to cure such diseases. I hope that you agree with some of what I state, for having a moral purpose is essential to long-term happiness!

      Yes, my ideas will work, and I am not sorry about it!

    • @rossmilburn

      “Fifth, your final argument is a little cynical, although stylishly satirical, so I assume that you are still youthful.”

      Yes, still youthful, and have been my whole 75 years, so far.

      I am almost convinced there are two different worlds. You say, “humans are naturally bold and self-reliant, just as they are intelligent and moral.” Perhaps they are in the world you have seen.

      My experience has been a completely different one. I, and others, like H.L. Mencken, and Twain, have traveled the world and found most people, though charming and interesting enough, and often, “bold,” like the street beggars in Thailand (very bold, in fact), with very rare exception most people are incompetent, ignorant, stupid, and famously superstitious.

      Here’s a little of Mencken’s view with which my experience totally agrees:

      “The costliest of all follies is to believe passionately in the palpably not true. It is the chief occupation of mankind. [H.L. Mencken, A Mencken Chrestomathy (1949)]

      “The curse of man, and cause of nearly all of his woes, is his stupendous capacity for believing the incredible.” [H.L. Mencken, A Mencken Chrestomathy (1949)]

      The average man never really thinks from end to end of his life. The mental activity of such people is only a mouthing of cliches. What they mistake for thought is simply a repetition of what they have heard. My guess is that well over 80 percent of the human race goes through life without having a single original thought. [H.L. Mencken, Minority Report]

      I have an article right here on Liberty.me addressing these observations: “Why Do Most People Believe What Is Not True?.”

      I’m not ignoring your other good comments, by the way. This is already too long, so I picked the one’s most interesting to me. So just one last comment on, “Surely you do not support Moslem laws in one country, Hindu laws in another, Jewish law in a third? That would be silly!”

      Yes, that would certainly be silly. I do not “support” any man-made laws. The principles of reality, both physical and ethical, are the only laws that matter because no one can violate them and get away with it.

  • Todd Baker posted an update 6 minutes ago

    It boggles my mind that Trump supporters think that he is a supporter of liberty and freedom.

  • I think that many of us have differing expectations. I would hope that a hundred or more privately funded communities can evolve and compete for residents. Each learning from the other.

  • Yes, same thing.

  • Conza replied to the topic challenge Hoppe supporters in the forum Austrian Economics 37 minutes ago

    Re: “These questions are hostile and irrelevant and I was trying to ignore them. You have ducked my main question, so I thought this was fair.”

    = They were a way to gauge your intellectual honesty. They aren’t red herrings. I’m attempting to ascertain why you’re unable to understand; and constantly jump all over the shop. Your reluctant answer to…[Read more]

  • Darryl W Perry posted an update 40 minutes ago

    Afghans brace for surge in violence after US kills Taliban leader :: House to consider impeachment of IRS chief at misconduct hearing Tuesday :: Baltimore police officer acquitted in Freddie Gray death

    #FPPradionews

  • Like most of the other arguments that begin with, How would a libertarian/anarchist society deal with…, the answer cannot be definitely known. People cry out for security, mistaking laws and badges, licenses and seals for a sure thing. But the very nature of liberty is based on a confidence in people’s ability to adapt, bolstered by continually…[Read more]

  • Leanne Baker posted an update 46 minutes ago

    Powerful! John McAfee.

  • Michael Kreitzer posted an update 1 hour, 17 minutes ago

    “The reader may say to himself, ‘When will people learn?’ Sadly, they don’t. Incredibly, when the reichsmark collapsed in 1923, no one blamed the excessive printing. In fact, many people felt that if only the printing had continued just a bit longer, everything might have been all right.

    […]

    Ben Bernanke, just two years prior to being named h…[Read more]

  • Michael Kreitzer posted an update 1 hour, 17 minutes ago

    “The reader may say to himself, ‘When will people learn?’ Sadly, they don’t. Incredibly, when the reichsmark collapsed in 1923, no one blamed the excessive printing. In fact, many people felt that if only the printing had continued just a bit longer, everything might have been all right.

    […]

    Ben Bernanke, just two years prior to being named h…[Read more]

  • Ruben Alexander published a new article, Antpool Will Not Run SegWit Without Block Size Increase Hard Fork, on the site Bitcoin Magazine 1 hour, 33 minutes ago

    antpool-will-not-run-segwit-without-block-size-increase-hard-forkAlthough there has been some serious, public drama over scaling in the Bitcoin community for over a year, it appears that the community is mostly unified behind a single plan going forward, which is based on the [Read story]
  • Or should there be prisons?

    There was one video I saw on You tube but I cant find it, stating “No prisons in a Free society.”

    If everyone carried guns, would we even need State/Federal prisons?

    I believe you should have private institutions like extended care living facilities that could be charity based, to look after so called, “criminals.”…[Read more]

  • Re: “Same thing?”

    = The problem with shouting “Tyranny!” in a crowded theater

    … The rights/actions distinction shows how some of the general notions usually assumed to derive from the theater example are confused (see Murray Rothbard, The Ethics of Liberty, 113–18). First, a person has a right to be the one—as opposed to someone else—wh…[Read more]

  • Jakob Renner posted an update 2 hours, 18 minutes ago

    Diligent as one must be in learning, one must be as diligent in forgetting; otherwise the process is one of pedantry, not culture.

    Albert Jay Nock

  • Petr Zdeněk just joined Liberty.me 2 hours, 41 minutes ago

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