Description

Depending on who you listen to, China is either poised to become a superpower or a disaster waiting to fall under its own weight.

For Valentin Schmid, both scenarios are overrated. A business editor with the Epoch Times—the premier international media outlet on China—he doesn’t see Beijing becoming the center of the world or collapsing.

He argues that the alleged Chinese economic miracle is anything but, and that downright cronyism is ultimately behind many investment and diplomatic moves.

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Meet the hosts

Brien Lundin is president and CEO of Jefferson Financial, which publishes Gold Newsletter and hosts the New Orleans Investment Conference. He has four decades of experience in investment markets.
Fergus Hodgson is the chief executive of Antigua International, a consulting firm that connects the Americas, and he is the roving editor of Gold Newsletter. Originally from New Zealand, he has been a nomad for the past eight years, and his personal blog is the Stateless Man.

discussions

  • Where is the best place to which to emigrate? OF all the places I’ve visited, I would put Australia number one. It is freer than the US, the culture and people are amazing, the technology is excellent, and it seems like the perfect happy place for me to live and work. I see no real downside at all. I know the government is terrible but so it is everywhere in the world. Second choice might be Costa Rica.

    Jump to Discussion Post 91 replies
  • Perhaps you will find this magnificent BBC documentary interesting. It tells the story of the ancient city of Caral, a little north of Lima on the coast of Peru, which is arguably the oldest city in and the beginning of civilization in the Americas. The Lost Pyramids Of Caral There are two points I would like to make about the story told therein of Caral which I think are relevant to libertarians. 1) The early civilization of Caral apparently arose purely out of commerce. This confirms the insights of the Austrian school of economics. And it may be an example of a commercially organized cooperative human society that antedates the rise of any state. 2) This contradicts the presumptions brought to the study by the archaeologists. For one example, at 7:20 one states the following. You can’t build … on the basis of consensus. You have to have leaders and followers. You have to have specialists. You have to have people who are in charge. People who can tell individual groups, alright, today you will be doing this. This group you are going to be doing something different. In other words, in his academic world, the possibility is inconceivable of that human cooperation could be organized by trade — the marketplace — rather than authority.

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  • There are some ways in which buying a house can be a path to independent living.   On the other hand, we’re expecting currency devaluation and the housing market is propped up on limbo rates. Is it worth taking on debt to buy? Will inflation eat away at the principal, or would you have been better off in PMs?   Have you bought recently? What factored into your decision?

    Jump to Discussion Post 16 replies
  • Ok I was thinking about myself here: bills paid, only debt is a low interest mortgage, PM stored, some cash money saved. Which is it better to do when investing surpluses and savings between $500-$1000: 1) Put it all on one stock/etf/etc  the whole lump and then save up for the next buy (thus avoiding trading and transaction fees) 2) Pick a spread of affordable and undervalued stocks etc to avoid having all you investment money in too few stocks?

    Jump to Discussion Post 10 replies
  • In the, now famous, clip above Milton Friedman makes the argument that the market imposes costs to discrimination where ‘equal work’ laws would not. Is there a name for this economic insight? Can this be applied to other aspects of life, and if so, how?

    Jump to Discussion Post 1 reply