Description

Finance is awash with data: where to begin?

Graham Neary CFA is both a technical and fundamental analyst, and he teaches clients and students how to read financial statements. The predicament individual investors face is the tradeoff between precious time for research and forgone gains. How much time actually brings higher returns? Often, unfortunately, people just waste time and find themselves losing money on excessive trading.

The good news, though, is that there are more tools available now than ever before. One can piggyback on the research of others, as manifested in price signals of efficient markets, or learn by way of crowdsourced feedback and support. Online platforms such as Reddit, for example, readily take questions from both experienced and novice investors.

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Meet the hosts

Fergus Hodgson is the chief executive of Antigua International, a consulting firm that connects the Americas, and he is the roving editor of Gold Newsletter. Originally from New Zealand, he has been a nomad for the past eight years, and his personal blog is the Stateless Man.
Brien Lundin is president and CEO of Jefferson Financial, which publishes Gold Newsletter and hosts the New Orleans Investment Conference. He has four decades of experience in investment markets.

discussions

  • What role (if any) should the gov’t play in the continued funding of cutting-edge scientific research? According to the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and  Development), approximately 10% of all R&D conducted globally is directly funded by governments, with approximately 60% done by private industry and 20% by educational institutions. Granted, this number probably doesn’t take into account indirect gov’t funding through tax subsidies and incentives. That 10% goes towards projects on the cutting edge of science, such as NASAs various space ventures and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (funded through the governments of the member states). Proponents of big gov’t science, such as Neil Degrasse Tyson, have stated in the past that projects like these are unlikely to be privately funded due to their high risk, high cost, and lack of return on investment. Gov’t, claims Tyson, is required to make the initial step and take all the risk so that private firms can follow in its wake with a clear picture of the requirements of such endeavours. TAM 2011: Our Future in Space Would such high risk, high cost projects be possible without gov’t backing?

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  • Cryptocurrency Opportunists Investors and early adopters of cryptocurrency recognize the inevitable revolutionary change awaiting society and the huge income opportunity before them as they prepare to capitalize on the mainstream public adoption of this new technology trend in the next 24 to 36 months. The purpose of this whitepaper is to bring clarity to the marketplace to help investors and early adopters recognize where real value and opportunities lie. – Bob Wood , CEO, Nexxus Partners

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  • Perhaps you will find this magnificent BBC documentary interesting. It tells the story of the ancient city of Caral, a little north of Lima on the coast of Peru, which is arguably the oldest city in and the beginning of civilization in the Americas. The Lost Pyramids Of Caral There are two points I would like to make about the story told therein of Caral which I think are relevant to libertarians. 1) The early civilization of Caral apparently arose purely out of commerce. This confirms the insights of the Austrian school of economics. And it may be an example of a commercially organized cooperative human society that antedates the rise of any state. 2) This contradicts the presumptions brought to the study by the archaeologists. For one example, at 7:20 one states the following. You can’t build … on the basis of consensus. You have to have leaders and followers. You have to have specialists. You have to have people who are in charge. People who can tell individual groups, alright, today you will be doing this. This group you are going to be doing something different. In other words, in his academic world, the possibility is inconceivable of that human cooperation could be organized by trade — the marketplace — rather than authority.

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  • I have been developing a language learning computer program and would like to get an investor involved to help my team get that boost of capital we need to complete our projects. However, I cannot imagine getting along well with most Angel Investors because our acceptable means of making money would likely lead to conflict (I would never accept a military contract if offered, nor would I use a patent I held to offensively shut down competitors). I was wondering if anyone knew of any links where I could find and contact AnCap Venture Capitalists or Angel Investors. Thanks.

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  • Here’s a discussion I had yesterday with my accountant. He claims that “we” need to have “legal certainty” to encourage other ti invest in our economy. And that Patents are “legal certainty”. Companies spend large amounts of money and time to do research and to innovate. While others just “copy” what the researchers, the investigators, the investors, generate: new products, new technologies, new medicine, whatever. Therefore, the innovators/investigators/investors will want protection: And if they didn’t have protection of their “creations”, “discoveries”, “inventions” or whatever you’d want to call it, the would not have the INCENTIVE to invest tons of funds on investigation, innovation and research. And therefore there would be no progress. What do you guys think? Your opinion is highly appreciated!

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