Description

Michael Strong loved learning but hated school. Now he designs schools that are not dry environments of passivity and dependence, but rather places of inspiration, innovation, excellence, and creativity.

In particular, he points out that much of conventional education is jumping through meaningless hoops, to pass junk exams that are poor gauges of proficiency. The good news is that in this era there are a growing number of alternatives for you to choose from, and the untapped potential is enormous.

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Meet the hosts

Brien Lundin is president and CEO of Jefferson Financial, which publishes Gold Newsletter and hosts the New Orleans Investment Conference. He has four decades of experience in investment markets.

discussions

  • Please join us in discussing the day’s presentations, and L.I.F.E. in general!

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  • I have had several quotes and memes come and go, but over the years the two things that I keep posted at my desk at work the most consistently are Invictus and IF…. I also had an Ayn Rand quote from Atlas Shrugged scrawled above my monitor for a long time. “Do not let your fire go out, spark by irreplaceable spark in the hopeless swamps of the not-quite, the not-yet, and the not-at-all. Do not let the hero in your soul perish in lonely frustration for the life you deserved and have never been able to reach. The world you desire can be won. It exists.. it is real.. it is possible.. it’s yours.”   What do you keep around for inspiration and where do you keep it?

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  • The other day I was reading The Perfect Storm by Johan Norberg and I suddenly realized how very alike a market is to an ecosystem. I’m a biologist by training but have only been reading Austrian economics for two years or so. The more I read the more I feel I should put together a course called “Economics for natural scientists”. The left has been completely in charge of academia here in Sweden for a long time, decades. However, it has proved rather more difficult to infiltrate the natural sciences than the social ditos. But they are doing it through appeals to emotion when it comes to environmental issues. By presenting political intervention as a given, the only question is how much. By exposing this and explaining the economic realities of examples like Tragedy of the commons I could at least help to counteract this, as we call it in Swedish, “rödröta”. Red rot. Now, I thought I’d come on here for some help to gather my thoughts and get your valuable input on points and examples to bring up, that are both pertinent to economics and environment. I’d like to be able to explain very simply and also stay constructive. – What are some good examples of basic economic principles? – What are some good enviro-examples where these principles are relevant? – What are some liberty/economic solutions to common environmental problems? – What should I read? I hope I was able to get across what I’m trying to do, I often get carried away by my thoughts. 1. Teach some basic economics to natural scientists in their language. Show analogies between ecosystems and markets to make the latter as intuitive as the former. 2. Illustrate through theory and real-world examples the difference between statism- and liberty- oriented approaches to solutions of environmental problems. + Success-stories. By this thread I hope to sketch out an outline of such a lecture series or course. Thank you SO much for helping out. My thoughts and ideas are just all over the place!

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  • Everyone seems to have an opinion when it comes to child behavior and I would really appreciate it if only people who had professional experience working with kids responded. I just started working in a public elementary school at their before school day care. I don’t teach anything. I mainly supervise the kids at the day care, walk them to the cafeteria for breakfast, and then walk them to their classroom. It’s in a nice area in San Francisco. I have one student that is just really bad and violent. Just today, he choked another kid for cutting in front of him in line when we were walking to the cafeteria. Then I heard him threaten to punch another kid “in the face and the eye.” Then he started a fight with another student but the other one grabbed his arms so they were just locked in that position. The kid is only 5 years old! I really didn’t know what to do so I just split them up and let it go. I only work there for two hours a day and everything that happened occurred within 20 minutes. So my question is, what would you do in this situation? Why do you think some kids are so violent? Is there another explanation beyond experiencing violence at home?

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