Description

In this episode of Office Hours, TK and Isaac riff on a recent blog post by Isaac about the idea of work-life balance and then answer questions about family and how to get better feedback. Questions: – How do I find my passion and make my family proud? – How do you ask more relevant questions and take action according to the answers? – How do you tell your family an important truth that you know will disappoint them? Topics Discussed: – The guilt lurking behind work-life-balance questions – What does it mean it to do good for your family – The danger of trying to make your family proud – Taking responsibility for your professional development – Asking for critical feedback – Why parents are invested in their kid’s decisions – Respect is more important than approval – Being clear about what you want going into a hard conversation.

See More See Less

Subscribe

Leave us a review, comment or subscribe!

Meet the hosts

I'm an entrepreneur, thinker, and communicator dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. I'm the founder and CEO of Praxis, an intensive ten-month program combining real world business experience with the best of online education for those who want more than college.

discussions

  • Hey everyone, we are starting a fun new series for the A/V page and Youtube channel. Post any question, no matter what, that you would like Jeffrey to answer in one minute, and we will ambush him with the best one. Looking forward to your awesome questions!

    Jump to Discussion Post 22 replies
  • How important is Discussion Netiquette in communicating with other liberty minded individuals who have different opinions on how liberty should be obtained? Is historical accuracy important? Is it acceptable to twist another person’s words to mean something entirely different from what they intended to say?  Are subtle forms of psychological manipulation disrespectful?

    Jump to Discussion Post 1 reply
  • Hi all, Would anyone in this group be interested in organizing a weekly Google+ Hangout where we can meet, discuss, and get feedback on our various investment ideas? I know that for me, being forced to discuss my ideas out loud works wonders to identify the holes in my thinking (in software development, this is sometimes called “rubber ducking“). This could also be a productive way to stay accountable to our respective financial goals:  as Rick pointed out in his class, creating and maintaining any investment plan requires hard work and commitment, something which gets much easier to do when you commit to making tangible weekly progress in front of a like-minded group face-to-face every week. Any interest in doing this? I live in Pacific Standard Time; and my ideal time would probably be 3 P.M. PST on Sundays (although my work schedule – and thus my overall schedule – is generally almost completely flexible). Looking forward to “meeting” all of you by Hangout!

    Jump to Discussion Post 7 replies
  • My engineering, physics and programming background got me started in philosophy of liberty for its universality and recognition of complexity deriving itself from many lower level systems. Once entering the liberty arena, I’ve never found the “natural rights” argument too compelling and the state scripture defining rights even less so. The most common thread I’ve seen inside the liberty community that tries to address ethics that aren’t derived from theocratic origins is Molyneux and his work “UPB A Rational Proof of Secular Ethics”. Not that I find his approach invalid, I’d just like to try an independent method of derivation and perhaps support some of such conclusion by other methods. My core approach is to consider any group of people as a complex system. Rules of emergent behavior within the system that allow favorable survival conditions “pass on their genes” in a way and echo forward in time. Destructive or parasitic norms dwindle the potential of survival even to the extent that each individual has within them the naturally selected abhorrence of seeing or being subjected to this freeloading behavior. I argue that the natural morals found within us free from any indoctrination are results of natural selection pressure of anthropological social structures being themselves naturally selected for their degree of stability. Only in recent human history has there been attempts to “design” these social structures with the ignorance of the complex system nature of society, abused anthropomorphic aggregation (“we are one nation”), or any type of government for that matter that tries to impose legislation over law (law being of the emergent behavior as Bastiat would know it). This has been my mental hobby horse for a while and I’ve been recently pleased by some of this type of thinking emerging in some of the conversations. Regarding stable social systems on a local level Economic stability with dispersed knowledge and the failure exogenous design of fundamental social system institutions I’d even open this up to the theist/atheist moral determination as it seems that theists always try to play this card. Church in this scope of thinking just happens to be one social institution that has been around longer than the recent rise of the nation-state.

    Jump to Discussion Post 0 replies
  • Hi all, Would anyone in this group be interested in organizing a weekly Google+ Hangout where we can meet, discuss, and get feedback on our various investment ideas? I know that for me, being forced to discuss my ideas out loud works wonders to identify the holes in my thinking (in software development, this is sometimes called “rubber ducking“). This could also be a productive way to stay accountable to our respective financial goals:  investing can be a minefield for procrastination, so setting weekly goals in front of a face-to-face group can be a powerful way to stay on track and maintain steady, incremental progress. Any interest in doing this?  I live in Pacific Standard Time; my work schedule is almost completely flexible for doing this, although Sunday afternoons or evenings would be ideal for me personally. Looking forward to “meeting” all of you by Hangout!

    Jump to Discussion Post 15 replies