Description

Teaching kids about money is one of the most important things you can do for your child, as a responsible parent. In this episode, James and Taylor talk about why it is so important to give your children a firm financial education.

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Meet the hosts

Rodger is a long-time libertarian activist, the founder of PaxLibertas Productions, host of The LAVA Flow podcast, Vice Chairman of the NHLP, Regional Captain for the Foundation for New Hampshire Independence and former Chairman and Secretary of the Libertarian Party of Arkansas. Rodger has also served on the national Libertarian Party Judicial Committee.

discussions

  • It appears to me that one of the biggest drawbacks to the current model of cryptocurrencies is the lack of reversibility in transactions. Historically, third parties such as banks have enabled transactions to be reversed, such as refunds or guaranteeing purchases. I think that if cryptocurrencies want to avoid third parties as much as possible, they should adopt a method for reversing transactions for the purpose of dispute resolution. Thoughts?

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  • Anyone out there able to recommend good reads for young kids (up to 5 or 6) with libertarian themes?.

    Jump to Discussion Post 19 replies
  • I currently have a 3 and 1 year old. I have been at ends searching for liberty minded books to read to them. Does anyone have any suggestions. I also teach school ages so please feel free to throw in books for older children.

    Jump to Discussion Post 8 replies
  • Most of the time when I am looking for a documentary’s most are very left leaning so I think we should start a list of documentary’s on liberty.me for libertarians and anarchists. I will start with 2 I am aware of   Terms and conditions may apply A documentary made about the hidden dangers in the terms and conditions of most software.   Libertopia A documentary made about the Free State Project.     I hope to see this list expand with many helpful and informative documentary’s.

    Jump to Discussion Post 27 replies
  • Hello, I’ve become quite keen on Jeffrey Rogers Hummel views on inflation. https://fee.org/articles/governments-diminishing-benefits-from-inflation/ That governments don’t get as much cash money as they used to from Seigniorage(money printing)…becuase of some details of the modern banking system. Hummels view is that the US Gov is more likely to actually default on it’s bonds than print it’s way out of it’s financial problems as so many of us libertairans often predict. Any way…. how are people actually calculating the revenue states are getting from seigniorage? There is constant mention to specific statistics in his works on what revenue governments make from printing money…but how are economists attempting to calculate this so exactly? “Almost none of the developed countries could boast seigniorage amounting to more than 1 percent of GDP, despite the fact that the study incorporated the inflationary years of the 1970s. Joseph H. Haslag’s smaller sample of 67 countries over a longer period, 1965 to 1994, finds that seigniorage averaged about 2 percent of total output for the entire sample, ranging from as low as 0.25 percent to as high as 9.98 percent (for Ghana).” However, I’m not smart enough to figure out how this is being calculated? When I Google — I see Seignoarge defined as the cost to money vs what the money is worth. (if it costs 1cent to print a dollar bill than Seigorage is 99cents). Pennies have negative seigniorage — cost the Gov more to mint than 1 cent.) But for the point Hummel is making it seems like a more sophisticated calculation? How did people figure out that for example in WW2 seignorage was 6%? Perhaps this is rather obvious? Thanks! –Luke

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