Description

Where we deliver Mining Insights & Bullion Sales, in the form of physical delivery, offshore depositories, and private blockchain distributed ledger technology you may reach us at [email protected]

Proven and Probable provides insights on mining companies, junior miners, gold mining stocks, uranium, silver, platinum, zinc & copper mining stocks, silver and gold bullion in Canada, the US, Australia and beyond.

Watch the video and visit our website for more details provenandprobable.com

For more info on Riverside Resources visit: www.rivres.com

Please share this video: youtu.be/-9jP4kEX9gQ

Riverside Resources (TSX.V: RRI | OTCQB: RVSDF).

In this exclusive interview, Dr. John-Mark Staude of Riverside Resources sits down with Maurice Jackson of Proven and Probable to discuss the strategic alliance with multi-billion cap BHP. The strategic alliance is focused in Sonora, Mexico. Riverside has been very active on the alliance and today Dr. Staude provides shareholders with some important updates.

Contact Riverside Resources:
Communications Team 778-327-6671
Email [email protected]

Contact me, Maurice Jackson, before you make your next physical precious metals purchase at 855.505.1900 or email [email protected].

WEBSITE: www.provenandprobable.com
YOUTUBE: www.youtube.com/c/provenandprobable
TWITTER: twitter.com/provenprobable

See More See Less

Subscribe

Leave us a review, comment or subscribe!

Meet the hosts

discussions

  • It appears to me that one of the biggest drawbacks to the current model of cryptocurrencies is the lack of reversibility in transactions. Historically, third parties such as banks have enabled transactions to be reversed, such as refunds or guaranteeing purchases. I think that if cryptocurrencies want to avoid third parties as much as possible, they should adopt a method for reversing transactions for the purpose of dispute resolution. Thoughts?

    Jump to Discussion Post 2 replies
  • Speculators, Take a look at the recent Precious Metals Summit for 2016. It has a vast amount of company presentations but consider paying particular attention to the Ross Beaty interview and the other keynote presentations.   http://www.gowebcasting.com/conferences/2016/09/14/precious-metals-summit

    Jump to Discussion Post 1 reply
  • Hello, I’ve become quite keen on Jeffrey Rogers Hummel views on inflation. https://fee.org/articles/governments-diminishing-benefits-from-inflation/ That governments don’t get as much cash money as they used to from Seigniorage(money printing)…becuase of some details of the modern banking system. Hummels view is that the US Gov is more likely to actually default on it’s bonds than print it’s way out of it’s financial problems as so many of us libertairans often predict. Any way…. how are people actually calculating the revenue states are getting from seigniorage? There is constant mention to specific statistics in his works on what revenue governments make from printing money…but how are economists attempting to calculate this so exactly? “Almost none of the developed countries could boast seigniorage amounting to more than 1 percent of GDP, despite the fact that the study incorporated the inflationary years of the 1970s. Joseph H. Haslag’s smaller sample of 67 countries over a longer period, 1965 to 1994, finds that seigniorage averaged about 2 percent of total output for the entire sample, ranging from as low as 0.25 percent to as high as 9.98 percent (for Ghana).” However, I’m not smart enough to figure out how this is being calculated? When I Google — I see Seignoarge defined as the cost to money vs what the money is worth. (if it costs 1cent to print a dollar bill than Seigorage is 99cents). Pennies have negative seigniorage — cost the Gov more to mint than 1 cent.) But for the point Hummel is making it seems like a more sophisticated calculation? How did people figure out that for example in WW2 seignorage was 6%? Perhaps this is rather obvious? Thanks! –Luke

    Jump to Discussion Post 2 replies
  • Perhaps you will find this magnificent BBC documentary interesting. It tells the story of the ancient city of Caral, a little north of Lima on the coast of Peru, which is arguably the oldest city in and the beginning of civilization in the Americas. The Lost Pyramids Of Caral There are two points I would like to make about the story told therein of Caral which I think are relevant to libertarians. 1) The early civilization of Caral apparently arose purely out of commerce. This confirms the insights of the Austrian school of economics. And it may be an example of a commercially organized cooperative human society that antedates the rise of any state. 2) This contradicts the presumptions brought to the study by the archaeologists. For one example, at 7:20 one states the following. You can’t build … on the basis of consensus. You have to have leaders and followers. You have to have specialists. You have to have people who are in charge. People who can tell individual groups, alright, today you will be doing this. This group you are going to be doing something different. In other words, in his academic world, the possibility is inconceivable of that human cooperation could be organized by trade — the marketplace — rather than authority.

    Jump to Discussion Post 8 replies
  • Banks have been blamed for having fractional reserves, instead of 100% reserves. What’s your opinion?

    Jump to Discussion Post 17 replies