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Hosts Ali and Austin talk about the climate change, regulation, and environmentalism. Join us every other Tuesday for a new episode!

Credits to

Hosts: Austin Mulka and Ali Hallal

Audio Engineer: Ben Vizy

Marketing and advertising: Zachary Woodman

Content Researcher: Grant McKinney

Manager: John Knetemann

Thank you to Liberty.me for allowing us to publish on their website!

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Meet the hosts

Students For Liberty is a rapidly growing network of pro-liberty students from all over the world. Our mission is to provide a unified, student-driven forum of support for students and student organizations dedicated to liberty. We accomplish this through a strategy of empowerment, identifying the top student leaders and training them to be agents of change in their communities. What began as a small meeting of young leaders has become an international movement of students with over 1,100 groups around the world and operations on every inhabited continent.

discussions

  • Perhaps you will find this magnificent BBC documentary interesting. It tells the story of the ancient city of Caral, a little north of Lima on the coast of Peru, which is arguably the oldest city in and the beginning of civilization in the Americas. The Lost Pyramids Of Caral There are two points I would like to make about the story told therein of Caral which I think are relevant to libertarians. 1) The early civilization of Caral apparently arose purely out of commerce. This confirms the insights of the Austrian school of economics. And it may be an example of a commercially organized cooperative human society that antedates the rise of any state. 2) This contradicts the presumptions brought to the study by the archaeologists. For one example, at 7:20 one states the following. You can’t build … on the basis of consensus. You have to have leaders and followers. You have to have specialists. You have to have people who are in charge. People who can tell individual groups, alright, today you will be doing this. This group you are going to be doing something different. In other words, in his academic world, the possibility is inconceivable of that human cooperation could be organized by trade — the marketplace — rather than authority.

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  • The other day I was reading The Perfect Storm by Johan Norberg and I suddenly realized how very alike a market is to an ecosystem. I’m a biologist by training but have only been reading Austrian economics for two years or so. The more I read the more I feel I should put together a course called “Economics for natural scientists”. The left has been completely in charge of academia here in Sweden for a long time, decades. However, it has proved rather more difficult to infiltrate the natural sciences than the social ditos. But they are doing it through appeals to emotion when it comes to environmental issues. By presenting political intervention as a given, the only question is how much. By exposing this and explaining the economic realities of examples like Tragedy of the commons I could at least help to counteract this, as we call it in Swedish, “rödröta”. Red rot. Now, I thought I’d come on here for some help to gather my thoughts and get your valuable input on points and examples to bring up, that are both pertinent to economics and environment. I’d like to be able to explain very simply and also stay constructive. – What are some good examples of basic economic principles? – What are some good enviro-examples where these principles are relevant? – What are some liberty/economic solutions to common environmental problems? – What should I read? I hope I was able to get across what I’m trying to do, I often get carried away by my thoughts. 1. Teach some basic economics to natural scientists in their language. Show analogies between ecosystems and markets to make the latter as intuitive as the former. 2. Illustrate through theory and real-world examples the difference between statism- and liberty- oriented approaches to solutions of environmental problems. + Success-stories. By this thread I hope to sketch out an outline of such a lecture series or course. Thank you SO much for helping out. My thoughts and ideas are just all over the place!

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  • Behind the Heroin Vaccine: Why There’s No Vaccination for Addiction Could regulation be stifling cures of drug abuse? Does policy like this save lives or harm them, how can you know if no experiments are even allowed?

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  • For libertarians who consider themselves environmentalist, What do you think should happen if someone dams up the river going through their property? Essentially ending all the profits or destroying the property value for all the other people that used that river.

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