Description

In this sixtieth episode, we’re talking abortion, chiropractors and we play a game where we guess whether a headline from a news article is sincere or satire. Strap in and get ready, cause this podcast has two people talking into microphones.

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Meet the hosts

Scott McDonald is the Ancap Barber. Born and raised in Huntsville AL, he is an agorist barber extraordinaire. Along with his beautiful wife, Erika McDonald, he fathers the wonder child, Elsie McDonald. Scott has been involved in political and philosophical discussion for most of his adult life. His mission in life is to spread liberty at every opportunity, as well as eventually owning his own barber shop. Adam Brown is a musician, libertarian, and minarchist, as well as the co-host of the Ancap Barber Shop. He and Scott make up the doom country duo, Pinecone Percy. Adam believes in minimal government and personal freedoms, you will usually find him shredding on a guitar, banging on drums or debating anarchy and religion with Scott. He was born and raised in Huntsville, AL. His goal is to share his passion for freedom and liberty to anyone and everyone.

discussions

  • Would it be worthwhile advocating for a voluntary state? Now this might seem a contradiction in terms, but consider this: 1) This state would collect voluntary taxation 2) Candidates would be elected by voters to spend the voluntary taxes on ‘public services’ such as welfare, public housing etc., all the goodies progressives want. 3) This state would not have the power to use force in its interactions with citizens Advocating such a system would show that these things can be paid for voluntary, and expose the gun in the room of our current system. Just a thought. Has such an idea ever been proposed? Would it be worthwhile?

    Jump to Discussion Post 6 replies
  • What is the origination of property rights? Where do they come from that you can reason their existence as natural? We usually argue for property rights at some point in our discussions as libertarians, but I’m curious as to where we can claim they’re from. Personally, I derive mine from God and my religious beliefs, similar to what Jefferson stated about God given rights. But what about someone who doesn’t believe in a deity? How can they derive property rights in a way that can’t be dismissed as ideals, but derived in nature? This is also (and arguably more so) important for arguing these natural rights to people who won’t accept a divine aspect. It’s important to have property rights, and they’re evidently beneficial, but the argument remains for declaring these as rights, otherwise the NAP is in jeopardy. How do we have a right to property?

    Jump to Discussion Post 11 replies
  • I look to Our history in the US. I feel that the rights were inborn unto themselves. They are are organic. I dont see it practical nor applicable that a Law creates a Right. At the very least a Law could create a “Privilege.”  But in a society of Libertarian tolerance, there would ideally be few of them. From this logic, one could say that life is a privilege, and we must act accordingly, this obviously conflicts with the slogan, “A right to life.” (Which reminds me, someone who is put to death, do they have the right to life or is life considered a privilege in a death penalty case?) No need to answer this, just thinking out loud. This came from Conservatives ALWAYS ANNOYINGLY SAYING: “We are a nation of laws,” “The Rule of Law.” ect ect ect. This country exists because of Laws. “We have to follow the law because its the Law” Is it possible that Mao Se Teng (sp?) Hitler or Stalin, justified it the same way?

    Jump to Discussion Post 4 replies
  • Can prostitution present a legitimate ethical dilemma? Is it more so an ethical dilemma than a moral one? Your thoughts?

    Jump to Discussion Post 2 replies
  • If prostitution were legal, how would the concept be taught to kids? How would you make kids understand it? Or your child understand it?

    Jump to Discussion Post 2 replies