Senator Rand Paul’s bold flat tax proposal made waves when it was released this week, but Ted Cruz has supported a flat tax for some time. Why does Paul get all the credit, while Cruz is seen as the also-ran?

Today’s Freedom Report podcast dives into the upcoming summer budget battles which will pit grassroots conservatives against establishment Republicans. Cruz and Paul aren’t likely to succeed in achieving significant cuts to the budget, but both have a chance to win the hearts of the grassroots by bucking the establishment of their party.

Cruz and Paul agree on quite a few issues, but disagree on those where substantive policy reforms put set Rand Paul apart as distinct from Cruz. Paul’s filibusters on drones and the NSA have made him a darling of the liberty movement, while Cruz has set himself as more traditional conservative. Will the grassroots be forced to pick sides against one another? And if so, would that mean eventual defeat for both coalitions if a challenger such as Jeb Bush continues to lead in the polls?

Also, Cruz’s recent flip-flop on the TPA trade deal has some conservatives and libertarians wondering if he’s changing positions out of principle, or political expediency. The Texas senator was widely criticized by his base for initially supporting the TPA, but now calls it a “corrupt” deal. Will Cruz say or do anything to win the presidency?

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Meet the hosts

Austin Petersen is the chief executive officer of Stonegait LLC, a for-profit consulting firm specializing in photo and video services. Stonegait also provides social media advice, political campaign expertise and grassroots organizing strategies to candidates for office or to brands looking for more exposure. Petersen is the editor in chief of The Libertarian Republic news magazine, one of the most read political news sites in the United States. He also hosts The Freedom Report podcast, which has 30,000 daily listeners. Petersen is the former Director of Production at FreedomWorks and was an Associate Producer for Judge Andrew Napolitano’s show, “Freedom Watch” on the Fox Business Network. Petersen built Judge Napolitano’s social networks boasting over 600,000 fans and millions of clicks a month. His work has appeared in Getty, Reuters, the LA Times, NBC and Time Magazine. He is also a frequent contributor on television appearing on Russia Today and on dozens of local radio shows. Austin grew up on a farm in the Midwest in a town called Peculiar, Missouri. Graduating from Missouri State University with a degree in the Fine Arts, Petersen moved to New York City after graduation to a pursue a career in media.


  • Clearly we have seen developing within our movement a divide if you will, between libertarians who are strong supporters of Rand Paul and those who since the 2012 election have moved away from asking for permission to be free and want nothing to do with a “democratic process” (especially after what happened to the Ron Paul delegates at the RNC). I happen to fall on the latter and my question to those who support Rand Paul is this: How much violence (force) will a Rand Paul administration use against me to bend me to the will of that government? ie. What happens if I don’t pay my taxes to a Rand Paul government? Does he stick to libertarian beliefs and let me go about my life freely or will i be subject to aggression?

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  • Hey Everyone, I’m new to but not to the Liberty Movement. I was paying attention to it in 2008 and finally drank the kool-aid in 2012. I’m posting here because I’ve been bootstrapping the development of a legislation alert app and I am hoping that it helps grassroots movements in shutting down bad legislation and getting good candidates elected. The basic idea is to connect our nation’s outspoken political activists (10% of the population roughly) with the remaining interested bystanders (about 49% of the population, representing people who care but prefer to remain anonymous) so that their combined leverage can shut down bad legislation or help get good legislation passed. Opinion data on pending bills is filterable by district and can be used to hold representatives accountable to the will of their constituency. Come election time, users can also easily compare their private voting history with a representative’s public voting record in order to make a much more informed vote than normal. There are two types of accounts: Mobilizers: These are public accounts that can be followed by other users and can post alerts on pending State and Federal legislation. This account type logs in via web browser and requires an invite code currently. Apptivists: These are private accounts that follow public accounts and vote on the bills they are alerted to by the Mobilizers. This account type logs in via a simple phone app and is open to anyone with an iOS device (Android coming soon!). Much more detailed info on the project can be found by scrolling down the homepage of our website: We’ve recently launched our MVP of the application and I’ve set up an invite code that can be used by people from if anyone here would like to register as a Public Mobilizer account. As this is my attempt to help promote liberty in our country, we have decided to make Apptivism free to use for both account types. Also, this app is meant to work together with other social media services like FB and Twitter. It’s not a replacement. That’s what is for. 😉 If anyone here has any questions, I’d love to answer them and I’d love to get feedback on the whether this type of system is something that could be useful to the liberty community. Thanks in advance! Cheers! seth PS: Here’s a brief video explaining the system:

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  • I recently read Hoppe’s Democracy: The God That Failed and it brings up a number of questions. I sent him an email with these questions and am still waiting for a reply. But I thought I’d put them out there in this group as well. There are five series of questions and this is the first batch. Is a covenant community binding for all time? Or can a member of a covenant society secede from it just as he ought to be able to secede from the state? Can the terms of the covenant be changed in the future and if so how? Can the covenant specify that all rules and restrictions covered in the covenant can be changed through democratic means – in other words through voting? And if so, can they do specify that this be done by simple majority rule or other ways as specified in the covenant? Further to this – am I correct in assuming that the terms of the covenant inhere to the property and not the person?  For example, I own property in a strata development which is covered by such a covenant. It binds me to the bylaws of the Strata Corporation and these rules can be changed by the members democratically at a meeting. The strata council enforces the rules, manages the budget, etc. I also pay strata fees which are analagous to taxes if this were a municipality. (The strata fees are actually more than the municipal taxes I pay, though the city provides a lot more services.)  And these rules inhere in the property, so if I sell it, the buyer is bound by the covenant. But I cannot secede from the covenant. In effect, a covenant community is really a mini-government, but organized as a contract rather than as a political entity. But in practice, is there really any difference? I have written on my blog about this a few times. Most notably here: and here: and here:  The latter contradicts the first two as I have had some change in thought on this. Feedback appreciated.

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  • Does voting and participating in the mass ritual of electing officials violate the NAP? Are plebiscites or referendums in violation of the NAP ?   Does popular will of a collective trump the individual rights and wishes of a minority?   And for those Liberty minded people that vote for a lesser of two or three evils, how does voting for any evil eradicate evil?   I am certain that these are age old questions and if they are over asked then please forgive me and ignore this thread.   I have heard Walter Blocks and others analogy of voting for a slave that beats you fewer times, etc but for me this does not satisfy my wishes and desires to end slavery.  The assumption and illusion that slavery was kind, pleasant and even benevolent has and did perpetuate the very institution that many sought to end.   All human coercive ownership should be the ultimate goal and not fifty shades of it. All the best Kym

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  • Thoughts?

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