Description

“Wall Street has embraced government,” says George Gilder, and he describes the industry as a beacon of cronyism rather financial innovation. He now believes in the dire need for sound money, ideally backed by gold, and the author of 20 books makes the case in The Scandal of Money: Why Wall Street Recovers but the Economy Never Does.

The good news is Gilder, cofounder of the Discovery Institute, is confident privately created digital currencies will bring down the central banks and their cartel affiliates. In this episode, he also discusses his notorious books against feminism and why they keep selling, many decades later.

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Meet the hosts

Brien Lundin is president and CEO of Jefferson Financial, which publishes Gold Newsletter and hosts the New Orleans Investment Conference. He has four decades of experience in investment markets.

discussions

  • Howdy all…first…this is awesome! lol I can’t believe I’m actually in it! Thanks everyone for doing this and putting this most excellent website together. So proud and happy to have a part. 🙂 Ok, so I’m looking to buy silver, but don’t know where to buy because a) I’m totally unfamiliar with the process an db) there seems to be lots and lots of options and it’s a little overwhelming. I’ve dealt with Amagi metals before, and I know they are pretty cool (one of their reps is ancap (they sponsored Speak Liberty NOW), and they’ve even posed on JT’s Facebook wall before…lol), and I’ve spoken to a rep with EuroPacific Capital previously. He was great, but they wanted a minimum of 5k or 10k )I forget which now). Shoudl I just go with a rep from somwhere, or does anyone have any suggestions? Thanks in advance! Cheers!

    Jump to Discussion Post 40 replies
  • Hi there! Can anyone give me some initial advice on where and how to purchase and store physical gold? I’ve never done this before and I figure this is probably the most trustworthy forum for such advice. A bit about my situation. I’m from the UK (Northern Ireland) and have bought gold coins in the past but these were always delivered to me and are in my own possession. I want to buy and store a much larger amount as safely as possible because holding this gold myself is not really an option. My reasoning is that I am considering selling my house and travelling around the world on a motorbike. Ultimately I would like to buy a rental property somewhere that would provide me with some passive income while I travel but would probably rule out the UK. This means I need to put the value somewhere in the mean time and it certainly is not going to be put in a bank! Thanks

    Jump to Discussion Post 22 replies
  • Speculators, Take a look at the recent Precious Metals Summit for 2016. It has a vast amount of company presentations but consider paying particular attention to the Ross Beaty interview and the other keynote presentations.   http://www.gowebcasting.com/conferences/2016/09/14/precious-metals-summit

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  • Hello, I’ve become quite keen on Jeffrey Rogers Hummel views on inflation. https://fee.org/articles/governments-diminishing-benefits-from-inflation/ That governments don’t get as much cash money as they used to from Seigniorage(money printing)…becuase of some details of the modern banking system. Hummels view is that the US Gov is more likely to actually default on it’s bonds than print it’s way out of it’s financial problems as so many of us libertairans often predict. Any way…. how are people actually calculating the revenue states are getting from seigniorage? There is constant mention to specific statistics in his works on what revenue governments make from printing money…but how are economists attempting to calculate this so exactly? “Almost none of the developed countries could boast seigniorage amounting to more than 1 percent of GDP, despite the fact that the study incorporated the inflationary years of the 1970s. Joseph H. Haslag’s smaller sample of 67 countries over a longer period, 1965 to 1994, finds that seigniorage averaged about 2 percent of total output for the entire sample, ranging from as low as 0.25 percent to as high as 9.98 percent (for Ghana).” However, I’m not smart enough to figure out how this is being calculated? When I Google — I see Seignoarge defined as the cost to money vs what the money is worth. (if it costs 1cent to print a dollar bill than Seigorage is 99cents). Pennies have negative seigniorage — cost the Gov more to mint than 1 cent.) But for the point Hummel is making it seems like a more sophisticated calculation? How did people figure out that for example in WW2 seignorage was 6%? Perhaps this is rather obvious? Thanks! –Luke

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  • How will people generate income and/or put food on the table as A.I. and automation continue to become more capable, self-learning, and cheaper? Eventually humans will be “unemployable”, much like horses are “unemployable” today, except for narrow novelty purposes (entertainment, sport, horse drawn carriages, etc.). How do we prep for technological unemployment?

    Jump to Discussion Post 29 replies