Description

Harris Kenny, Marketing Manager for Aleph Objects joins me to discuss their popular Lulzbot line of 3D printers, and the radical IP-free way the company is run.

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Meet the hosts

I'm an entrepreneur, thinker, and communicator dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. I'm the founder and CEO of Praxis, an intensive ten-month program combining real world business experience with the best of online education for those who want more than college.

discussions

  • I’ve just recently blogged about Insidious Government Encroachment which I believe would provide the basis on a useful discussion here.   I’d be interested and hearing the views and experiences of others from this group.

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  • Seems no one has linked to the Bip Cot concept yet so I’ll just make a quick intro post and see what comments move the discussion along. “The BipCot NoGov License allows any use of software, media, products or services EXCEPT by governments.” From the FAQ Q. So, the BipCot NoGov license…..is this a joke? A. No. It’s a license we wrote that we’re comfortable with. We are using it on software, media, products and services of our own, and we encourage others to use it. And it’s getting used and spread. For more on whether or not the BipCot license has “teeth”, please see Email conversation I had with Mark from Negativeland about BipCot.

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  • Hello every one! This is Jaime from Voluntaryist the Comic Series. I have been trying to figure out a way to get a reasonably-priced prototype made of the comic characters from Voluntaryist. I have spoken to several people about the topic, including a bit with Jason R. in his role for the Kronies cartoon series. The problem I face is that I don’t know of a reliable, U.S.-based service where  I can get a clear out-the-door price on a single action figure. If anyone has experience with 3D printing or has worked with a reputable designer with whom I can get clear pricing, I would be greatly appreciative. What I need to know is how much it would cost to get a prototype of either a posable or fixed figure, 4-6 inches, with coloring complete. (A finished product) That way, I can use the prototype for a mass/mini production run. I appreciate any thoughts you have on this process where you have specific insight/experience. (Yes, I know about Alibaba and Shapeways, but I need the human element with experience who can price me a figure with reasonable accuracy.) Thank you for your kind help!   -Jaime Early Voluntaryist Prototype Figure

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  • This is absolutely wonderful. Getting lots of attention today. From the NYT.

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  • This is horrifying.  As if Centralized Healthcare wasn’t enough, now they are trying to reign in what little progress we can hope for.  We should inform this debate and try to limit the regulation of this industry.   http://news.softpedia.com/news/Food-and-Drug-Administration-Public-Workshop-to-Set-3D-Printing-Rules-442869.shtml 3D printing technology has started to be used quite often, and effectively, by makers of food products, medicinal methods and even biochemical compounds and tissues. All this boils down to a whole new field of science. And like any field of science likely to affect the quality of living, and humankind’s way of life in general, some rules need to be followed. Alas, it’s kind of hard to follow the rules when there’s no clear list of what the rules are. After a point, vague guidelines just don’t cut it anymore. So the Food and Drug Administration, or FDA for short, is preparing a public workshop meant to set those ground rules. The workshop will take place on October 8, 2014, from 8 AM to 5 PM, and will seek to understand the technology, and what problems lie ahead of it. That’s just one of three goals though. The purpose of the workshop is three-fold, tri-pronged in other words. The second “prong” is creating awareness. The participants will have to find ways to ensure the safety of 3D printed medical devices. This is one of the classes of 3D printed products that could have the greatest short-term impact, and a similarly essential effect in the long term. The third purpose of the workshop will be to establish collaborations between those already involved in the industry and the ones that need the educational materials, standards, and guidance they come up with. Perfecting the performance and reliability of 3D printed devices is essential after all. Significant strides have been made in this direction already, with the use of a different material for the support structures, and the better resolution / print size. All in all, the workshop will revolve around the discussion called “Additive Manufacturing of Medical Devices: An Interactive Discussion on the Technical Considerations of 3-D Printing.” It will take place at the FDA’s White Oak Campus, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 31 Conference Center, the Great Room (Rm. 1503), Silver Spring, MD. You don’t even need to reach the campus. If you want to comment, you can do it electronically, through the regulations.gov website. Don’t expect a sheet of directions to be sent out immediately though. These things take time, so the first official rule set might not be ready until 2016. Still, at least this all means that 3D printing technology has become a field of study, research and development unto itself.

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