Description

To specialize or to generalize, that is the question – which I asked Chuck Grimmett, a web developer during the day and solver of interesting problems in creative ways during the night.

Chuck likes to dabble into many things while searching for might be interesting, and has an interesting approach to learning which entails the importance of feedback, that he shared with me.

Simple and tasty recipes can be found at cooklikechuck.com, while there is also a mouth watering podcast of his at snacktime.fm

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Meet the hosts

I'm an entrepreneur, thinker, and communicator dedicated to the relentless pursuit of freedom. I'm the founder and CEO of Praxis, an intensive ten-month program combining real world business experience with the best of online education for those who want more than college.

discussions

  • What role (if any) should the gov’t play in the continued funding of cutting-edge scientific research? According to the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and  Development), approximately 10% of all R&D conducted globally is directly funded by governments, with approximately 60% done by private industry and 20% by educational institutions. Granted, this number probably doesn’t take into account indirect gov’t funding through tax subsidies and incentives. That 10% goes towards projects on the cutting edge of science, such as NASAs various space ventures and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (funded through the governments of the member states). Proponents of big gov’t science, such as Neil Degrasse Tyson, have stated in the past that projects like these are unlikely to be privately funded due to their high risk, high cost, and lack of return on investment. Gov’t, claims Tyson, is required to make the initial step and take all the risk so that private firms can follow in its wake with a clear picture of the requirements of such endeavours. TAM 2011: Our Future in Space Would such high risk, high cost projects be possible without gov’t backing?

    Jump to Discussion Post 10 replies
  • I currently have a 3 and 1 year old. I have been at ends searching for liberty minded books to read to them. Does anyone have any suggestions. I also teach school ages so please feel free to throw in books for older children.

    Jump to Discussion Post 8 replies
  • Hi there Liberty.me members, this is my first discussion topic I started and a quite impotant one for me. The problem is that my little brother is heavily struggling in school and because we life in Germany it is a Public School and you have to go there until you are 18 years old. He is getting terrible grates and he is getting into truble with the teachers. He has to go to a regular Public School for at least 6 more years and with his current grades he will be forced to double a year if he doesn’t start improving. Me, thinking that the schools here in Germany are bullshit and even worse, you can’t really opt out, doesn’t help him. The problem is that he is lazy and has no motivation (no wonder since Public Schools just make you learn boring facts) to learn for the exams or even participate in the classes, so pretty much the same as me when I was in school, with the diffrence that I had at least ok grades most of the time and I actually liked to participate in the classes since just sitting there was so fu**ing boring. So nobody realy cared. So I am searching for advices and hints onto how I (or my Parents) can help my brother to at least get threw the minimum years of Public School.

    Jump to Discussion Post 11 replies
  • I’m interested in learning on to brew beer and wondered if there were any Liberty.me brewers? If there are what do you brew, what equipment do you use, and what was the best way you learned?

    Jump to Discussion Post 10 replies
  • Here’s a discussion I had yesterday with my accountant. He claims that “we” need to have “legal certainty” to encourage other ti invest in our economy. And that Patents are “legal certainty”. Companies spend large amounts of money and time to do research and to innovate. While others just “copy” what the researchers, the investigators, the investors, generate: new products, new technologies, new medicine, whatever. Therefore, the innovators/investigators/investors will want protection: And if they didn’t have protection of their “creations”, “discoveries”, “inventions” or whatever you’d want to call it, the would not have the INCENTIVE to invest tons of funds on investigation, innovation and research. And therefore there would be no progress. What do you guys think? Your opinion is highly appreciated!

    Jump to Discussion Post 29 replies