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Idaho is laying the groundwork to wrestle way the insurance market from the stranglehold Obamacare has had on it.

Thanks to Congress finally ending the individual mandate requiring you to purchase insurance, the Governor of Idaho was able to loosen restrictions on insurance companies allowing them to come up with more creative, low-cost ways to provide insurance.

What this means is more options with plans that offer fewer benefits but at a significantly reduced price.

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EURIKA! There is actually a way to have a plan to fit any budget. Amazing how well a free market can address most any problem.

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In other news the President has announced he’s running for reelection in 2020, going to far as to announce his campaign manager.

If you smell a massive marketing strategy here, you’re right. The Republicans are in trouble this year, and I think the president is attempting to revive the fervor surrounding his campaign by announcing his intention to run early.

Despite how you or I might feel about the president he is still very well liked by the Republican base, and his popularity continues to grow. (he has nearly a 50% approval rating)

2018 is going to be an exciting election year. Some seats are going to change hands, and we may even see the Republicans lose the Senate.

Only time will tell.

Jason

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discussions

  • What role (if any) should the gov’t play in the continued funding of cutting-edge scientific research? According to the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and  Development), approximately 10% of all R&D conducted globally is directly funded by governments, with approximately 60% done by private industry and 20% by educational institutions. Granted, this number probably doesn’t take into account indirect gov’t funding through tax subsidies and incentives. That 10% goes towards projects on the cutting edge of science, such as NASAs various space ventures and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (funded through the governments of the member states). Proponents of big gov’t science, such as Neil Degrasse Tyson, have stated in the past that projects like these are unlikely to be privately funded due to their high risk, high cost, and lack of return on investment. Gov’t, claims Tyson, is required to make the initial step and take all the risk so that private firms can follow in its wake with a clear picture of the requirements of such endeavours. TAM 2011: Our Future in Space Would such high risk, high cost projects be possible without gov’t backing?

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  • It can be a challenge to keep up with all the taxes one needs to pay throughout the year, and than to deal with all the paperwork that needs to be filed can be frustrating. What would be a good way to simplify the Tax Code? Below is a list of some of the taxes that we the people need to pay, or at least we experience their effects at one time or another. -Medicare, Medicare, Social Security, Federal Inocme Tax, State tax, Local Tax, Corporate tax, Sales Tax, Property Tax, estate tax, alcohol tax, tobacco tax, gift tax, tariffs on imports and exports, etc. Would a simple flat or consumption tax do the trick?

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  • I’m an Anesthesiologist and am trying to reach out to other Anesthesiologists in the nation to request their support. This year at the society meeting (over 15K attendees) the ASA has Dr. Michael Portman, an economist, head of the Harvard Business school… as the keynote speaker.  I’d like to counter with an Austrian economist at next year’s conference in Boston.  I’ve corresponded with Tom Woods, and now just need to get the ASA to hear from members and/or attendees, that they’d like the ASA to invite Dr. Woods. I’d be most grateful for any and all help getting ASA members, anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists, anesthesia assistants, to contact the ASA and encourage them to invite Dr. Tom Woods. [email protected] even if you could forward my request to folks you believe may be able to assist, I’d be grateful!   thanks!

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  • Venezuela has the highest violent crime rate in the world. Though it is not moral or justified, people choose violence over starvation when there are no alternatives. Of course, “we” libertarians all know that this situation was created by government/s coercion’s consequences, but so few among the greater population seem to recognize that. It seems like a similar fate faces the whole world.

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  • Perhaps you will find this magnificent BBC documentary interesting. It tells the story of the ancient city of Caral, a little north of Lima on the coast of Peru, which is arguably the oldest city in and the beginning of civilization in the Americas. The Lost Pyramids Of Caral There are two points I would like to make about the story told therein of Caral which I think are relevant to libertarians. 1) The early civilization of Caral apparently arose purely out of commerce. This confirms the insights of the Austrian school of economics. And it may be an example of a commercially organized cooperative human society that antedates the rise of any state. 2) This contradicts the presumptions brought to the study by the archaeologists. For one example, at 7:20 one states the following. You can’t build … on the basis of consensus. You have to have leaders and followers. You have to have specialists. You have to have people who are in charge. People who can tell individual groups, alright, today you will be doing this. This group you are going to be doing something different. In other words, in his academic world, the possibility is inconceivable of that human cooperation could be organized by trade — the marketplace — rather than authority.

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