Description

Is bitcoin money? Keith Weiner discusses why gold is crucial in an economy and that bitcoin isn’t money. Keith also discusses why the system if failing today.  His view of why the system is failing is much different than the mainstream view. You don’t want to miss this insightful interview with Keith Weiner!

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Meet the hosts

I farm and work on a feedlot just outside of Billings, MT. My dad and I will feed up to 8,000 head of cattle every year at the feedlot. As of September 20th I launched a podcast on iTunes where I talk about the current issues of the day. My mantra is defending the free market and making the moral case for capitalism! My show is weekly and is available on iTunes, Stitcher and your web browser.

discussions

  • This is the one I use http://preev.com just because t is simple and tells you what you need to know

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  • And we thought we were excited when ETH was 2.00 USD per ETH. 10 USD and up! Market cap is larger than all other crypto-currencies combined (minus BTC). Wouldn’t be surprised to see some pullback for a bit while short term traders take profits. https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/ethereum/ https://coinmarketcap.com/      

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  • Speculators, Take a look at the recent Precious Metals Summit for 2016. It has a vast amount of company presentations but consider paying particular attention to the Ross Beaty interview and the other keynote presentations.   http://www.gowebcasting.com/conferences/2016/09/14/precious-metals-summit

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  • So I have this warning when I log into my Poloniex account that is specific to New Hampshire residents. So much for being the Free State. Any other free staters know what this is all about? I’m going through the process now of moving my ETH.  

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  • Hello, I’ve become quite keen on Jeffrey Rogers Hummel views on inflation. https://fee.org/articles/governments-diminishing-benefits-from-inflation/ That governments don’t get as much cash money as they used to from Seigniorage(money printing)…becuase of some details of the modern banking system. Hummels view is that the US Gov is more likely to actually default on it’s bonds than print it’s way out of it’s financial problems as so many of us libertairans often predict. Any way…. how are people actually calculating the revenue states are getting from seigniorage? There is constant mention to specific statistics in his works on what revenue governments make from printing money…but how are economists attempting to calculate this so exactly? “Almost none of the developed countries could boast seigniorage amounting to more than 1 percent of GDP, despite the fact that the study incorporated the inflationary years of the 1970s. Joseph H. Haslag’s smaller sample of 67 countries over a longer period, 1965 to 1994, finds that seigniorage averaged about 2 percent of total output for the entire sample, ranging from as low as 0.25 percent to as high as 9.98 percent (for Ghana).” However, I’m not smart enough to figure out how this is being calculated? When I Google — I see Seignoarge defined as the cost to money vs what the money is worth. (if it costs 1cent to print a dollar bill than Seigorage is 99cents). Pennies have negative seigniorage — cost the Gov more to mint than 1 cent.) But for the point Hummel is making it seems like a more sophisticated calculation? How did people figure out that for example in WW2 seignorage was 6%? Perhaps this is rather obvious? Thanks! –Luke

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