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Is there a major difference in free market and socialized health care? Why should we care? Also, What’s in the News with stories on hate speech bans, helping homeless people bans, federal cannabis bans, and feds selling Bitcoin. And, an Ask Me Anything segment with several questions from you guys, my awesome listeners! This episode is brought to you by Heleum, a long-term savings accelerator allowing you to start investing in cryptos, without you having to do the busy work. Also brought to you by NordVPN, the fastest, easiest to use service to protect your online presence that I’ve ever seen.

WHAT’S RUSTLING MY JIMMIES

On my list of potential episode topics, I’ve had free market healthcare vs. socialist healthcare for a long time, but have just never had a good chance to get to it yet. Well, with the recent news that Britain has canceled 50,000 surgeries due to overcrowding at hospitals this winter, I felt like now was a great time for the discussion.

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Meet the hosts

Rodger is a long-time libertarian activist, the founder of PaxLibertas Productions, host of The LAVA Flow podcast, Vice Chairman of the NHLP, Regional Captain for the Foundation for New Hampshire Independence and former Chairman and Secretary of the Libertarian Party of Arkansas. Rodger has also served on the national Libertarian Party Judicial Committee.

discussions

  • I’ve just recently blogged about Insidious Government Encroachment which I believe would provide the basis on a useful discussion here.   I’d be interested and hearing the views and experiences of others from this group.

    Jump to Discussion Post 6 replies
  • Perhaps you will find this magnificent BBC documentary interesting. It tells the story of the ancient city of Caral, a little north of Lima on the coast of Peru, which is arguably the oldest city in and the beginning of civilization in the Americas. The Lost Pyramids Of Caral There are two points I would like to make about the story told therein of Caral which I think are relevant to libertarians. 1) The early civilization of Caral apparently arose purely out of commerce. This confirms the insights of the Austrian school of economics. And it may be an example of a commercially organized cooperative human society that antedates the rise of any state. 2) This contradicts the presumptions brought to the study by the archaeologists. For one example, at 7:20 one states the following. You can’t build … on the basis of consensus. You have to have leaders and followers. You have to have specialists. You have to have people who are in charge. People who can tell individual groups, alright, today you will be doing this. This group you are going to be doing something different. In other words, in his academic world, the possibility is inconceivable of that human cooperation could be organized by trade — the marketplace — rather than authority.

    Jump to Discussion Post 8 replies
  • There are some ways in which buying a house can be a path to independent living.   On the other hand, we’re expecting currency devaluation and the housing market is propped up on limbo rates. Is it worth taking on debt to buy? Will inflation eat away at the principal, or would you have been better off in PMs?   Have you bought recently? What factored into your decision?

    Jump to Discussion Post 16 replies
  • In the, now famous, clip above Milton Friedman makes the argument that the market imposes costs to discrimination where ‘equal work’ laws would not. Is there a name for this economic insight? Can this be applied to other aspects of life, and if so, how?

    Jump to Discussion Post 1 reply
  • This is horrifying.  As if Centralized Healthcare wasn’t enough, now they are trying to reign in what little progress we can hope for.  We should inform this debate and try to limit the regulation of this industry.   http://news.softpedia.com/news/Food-and-Drug-Administration-Public-Workshop-to-Set-3D-Printing-Rules-442869.shtml 3D printing technology has started to be used quite often, and effectively, by makers of food products, medicinal methods and even biochemical compounds and tissues. All this boils down to a whole new field of science. And like any field of science likely to affect the quality of living, and humankind’s way of life in general, some rules need to be followed. Alas, it’s kind of hard to follow the rules when there’s no clear list of what the rules are. After a point, vague guidelines just don’t cut it anymore. So the Food and Drug Administration, or FDA for short, is preparing a public workshop meant to set those ground rules. The workshop will take place on October 8, 2014, from 8 AM to 5 PM, and will seek to understand the technology, and what problems lie ahead of it. That’s just one of three goals though. The purpose of the workshop is three-fold, tri-pronged in other words. The second “prong” is creating awareness. The participants will have to find ways to ensure the safety of 3D printed medical devices. This is one of the classes of 3D printed products that could have the greatest short-term impact, and a similarly essential effect in the long term. The third purpose of the workshop will be to establish collaborations between those already involved in the industry and the ones that need the educational materials, standards, and guidance they come up with. Perfecting the performance and reliability of 3D printed devices is essential after all. Significant strides have been made in this direction already, with the use of a different material for the support structures, and the better resolution / print size. All in all, the workshop will revolve around the discussion called “Additive Manufacturing of Medical Devices: An Interactive Discussion on the Technical Considerations of 3-D Printing.” It will take place at the FDA’s White Oak Campus, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 31 Conference Center, the Great Room (Rm. 1503), Silver Spring, MD. You don’t even need to reach the campus. If you want to comment, you can do it electronically, through the regulations.gov website. Don’t expect a sheet of directions to be sent out immediately though. These things take time, so the first official rule set might not be ready until 2016. Still, at least this all means that 3D printing technology has become a field of study, research and development unto itself.

    Jump to Discussion Post 0 replies