Description

“Give me a lawyer dog” apparently refers to some strange animal only found in Louisiana that has four legs, wags it’s tail, and has a law degree. What’s in the News with stories on prostitution, a Catalonia update, my October Contest Winners, a nurse Wubbels update, Trump’s Twitter, DUI on a horse, and free-market vs. government. Also, and Ancap App segment with updates on Open Bazaar and Signal. And, a Burning Books segment on Chasing the Scream by Johann Hari. This episode is brought to you by Tom Woods’s Liberty Classroom, helping you to become a smarter and more informed libertarian than ever before, for just 24 cents a day.

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Meet the hosts

Rodger is a long-time libertarian activist, the founder of PaxLibertas Productions, host of The LAVA Flow podcast, Vice Chairman of the NHLP, Regional Captain for the Foundation for New Hampshire Independence and former Chairman and Secretary of the Libertarian Party of Arkansas. Rodger has also served on the national Libertarian Party Judicial Committee.

discussions

  • I’m a computer science major (payed for by the GI bill, the only thing I got out of the military) and in my second year. In two years I have only taken a grand total of 3 CS (Computer Science) classes. What I have taken is a lot of Gen. Ed., learn to love the country classes like American Government, American Literature, American History, etc.. I see a lot of computer companies (both development and design) that pay no mind to degrees. They want to see portfolios, freelance work, internships, GitHub profiles, things of that sort. But I’m not getting that out of college. What I have got is a partial structure, an understanding of what I need to learn that you won’t find on the hundreds of websites out there that purport to “teach programming”. (They don’t.)  However, it’s very slow going and doing small programs to prove concepts isn’t impressive to employers. I have plans for a site that takes teaching programming seriously and goes far beyond the throwaways like Codecademy and (ick) “The New Boston”.  The problem is the cost and time. (Most of my time is currently dedicated to keeping up with calculus.) I was actually in talks with a design company for stage one development that might give me a jumping point so that I could start posting what curriculum I’ve written. No luck, in the end, they decided my budget was not good enough. =/ But I digress. Here’s what I’m getting at. Many people within the liberty movement have an interest in computers or have jobs related to them. (I’ve met many programmers and developers who subscribe to liberty.) Here’s the questions for your consideration: Did you attend a college or university? Did you get a degree or drop out? If not, do you feel like you could do better with a degree? If so, do you feel like it was a valuable use of your time and money? What would you say to someone who struggles to keep up with keeping their grades up and using what little free time they have to actually learn something? Note: This is my first post to Liberty.me, it’s not meant to be well structured, it’s just something for consideration and discussion. 🙂  

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  • For the past few years, police departments have been on something of a power trip in the United States. Only citing the lesser-known instances that come to my mind, cops have assaulted autistic teenagers and murdered unarmed civilians, and were subsequently cleared of all charges and let back on the force. A zealous, dogmatic conservative “fanbase,” alongside a legal system that actively defends police from facing charges of murder, manslaughter, or assault, assures that these men and women never see justice for their actions. It’s awful what police are doing in society, but it’s even worse that they can get off scot-free for it. Of course, most of you already know this. So here’s my question: has any United States representative or senator proposed a bill designed to fight against unjust acquittals or introduce charges that are harder to to be overturned? As an agorist, I’m partially convinced that this has never happened and that anyone who gets elected for public office in this day and age is a vapid authoritarian, but a sliver of hope remains for me somewhere. Have any of you heard of such legislation on a federal level? If not, then what about on a state level?

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  • Its seems they always skip over the issue. There is always this refusal to acknowledge or “give-in” in to the reality of what its happening on their part Does anyone know why this mentality exists? Is there anyway to stop it? Or try to get through to these people that’s its tyranny that is the enemy?

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  • https://whispersystems.org/ Why is it so difficult to convince friends and family to switch to an encrypted messaging system? It takes less than 30 seconds to install yet most people refuse to use it due to: 1) I have nothing to hide. 2) I don’t feel like it. 3) It doesn’t matter. I’ve convinced people to acknowledge all the benefits but still people just don’t seem to care. Is it excessive to encourage use of end to end encryption?

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  • In a stateless society, there is no monopoly on criminal justice that can grant immunity from prosecution to a minor criminal in order to get testimony that can convict a major criminal. One court company could grant immunity, but then another could use the minor criminal’s testimony to pursue a case against that person. Is there a way to make this work, or would a stateless society have to seek justice without the evidence gained from immunity grants?

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