Description

Scott talks to Andy Worthington about Guantanamo Bay, where dozens of prisoners are still detained without charges under suspicion of involvement in terrorism. Worthington reminds us that President Obama campaigned on closing the prison, but quickly gave up after resistance from republicans. Trump, meanwhile, has kept his campaign promise not to release any more prisoners. Worthington fears that the plight of these men being detained with no hope of justice is simply not a cause most Americans care about. He continues to do what he can to keep the issue in the public consciousness.
Discussed on the show:
The Guantanamo Files: The Stories of 774 Detainees in America’s Illegal Prison
Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo
“The Guantánamo “Suicides”” (Harper’s Magazine)
“The Report (2019)” (IMDb)
Andy Worthington is the author of Guantanamo Files and the director of “Outside the Law: Stories from Guantanamo.” Read his work at the Future of Freedom Foundation and AndyWorthington.co.uk and follow him on Twitter @GuantanamoAndy.
This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: NoDev NoOps NoIT, by Hussein Badakhchani; The War State, by Mike Swanson; WallStreetWindow.com; Tom Woods’ Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; Listen and Think Audio; TheBumperSticker.com; and LibertyStickers.com.
Donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal, or Bitcoin: 1Ct2FmcGrAGX56RnDtN9HncYghXfvF2GAh.

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discussions

  • I am not going to deny this as a new Marine, but the government mafia certainly makes you feel like you’re up there on a special status everywhere you go. It’s similar to being a “Made Man” in the Mafia in every shape or form. And sometimes it makes me feel torn apart because I enjoy it, while at the same time, trying to stick true to my values.   What I mean is that the respect people just give to you when they learn that you’re a Marine. They just literally go the extra mile all of a sudden over the Average Joe next to you. It’s not just that, but also a sense of belonging when you meet someone that just went through training with you, or another Marine on leave that just ran into you. For example: On my way home from Recruit Training last week, I was still in my Dress Blue Delta’s (for those who don’t know, the uniform consists of a white barracks cover (or hat), short khaki shirt, blue pants, and nice shiny black dress shoes). The moment I got out of the car to grab an airport cart for my bags, the security cop (not TSA) waived the $5 fee without question. When I went to check in my baggage, the ticket agent said not to worry about it as it wasn’t required for military members to get paid. At the security line, I was waived through even the PreCheck line without hassle. Waiting for my flight, I met up with two other guys that also just got out of Recruit Training. We weren’t in the same platoons, but instantly connected because of the training. Then another Marine we didn’t even know talked to us and we all soon were having a good time. On my flight home from Los Angeles to Seattle (I flew from San Diego to Los Angeles first), one First Class passenger offered to pay for all my drinks while the airline said that the snacks that I wanted were on the house. I’m not going to lie, all of this felt great when you have people doing that kind of stuff. But I know it was just like “Made Man” rituals of the Mafia and felt uncomfortable at times. For guys out there who’ve done it before, how did you overcome that in order to leave? I have a feeling that besides myself, many liberty minded military guys be it Marines, Army, Navy, whatever, decide to stay because they’re addicted to the respect people give to you. How do you overcome the enjoyments of free drinks, waivers, and the whole nine yards to separate yourself from the machine?

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  • Suppose a group of Ancaps are on the verge of overthrowing a government somewhere and imposing a libertarian social order. Suppose there was a debate in the US about whether to use the military to help them, stop them, or do nothing. Which do you choose and why?

    Jump to Discussion Post 8 replies
  • Or should there be prisons? There was one video I saw on You tube but I cant find it, stating “No prisons in a Free society.” If everyone carried guns, would we even need State/Federal prisons? I believe you should have private institutions like extended care living facilities that could be charity based, to look after so called, “criminals.” My idea, was that you can have one that looks after each-type-of-crime. Such as, having one facility for violent criminals, another for sex criminals, and another for theft. That way, each category can be examined separately instead of throwing them in all-together which is a festering danger. If any of you can help me find information on no prisons in a free society., please let me know. Videos are always great and easy.

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  • Decades from now, when the leading political figures of this era are dead or dying and will thus not be prosecuted for anything, classified information from this era will be released. This will show that Ambassador Chris Stevens either knew something, did something, or was about to do something that the Obama regime hated. Killing one’s own ambassador would be political suicide, but when violence broke out in Benghazi, Obama, Clinton, and the rest chose not to let a crisis go to waste.

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  • The Drone Papers The Intercept has obtained a cache of secret documents detailing the inner workings of the U.S. military’s assassination program in Afghanistan, Yemen, and Somalia. The documents, provided by a whistleblower, offer an unprecedented glimpse into Obama’s drone wars.

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