Description

Brad Hoff, Managing Editor of Levant Report and a former Marine, discusses how his experience living in Syria for several years differs from the Western media’s portrayal of the country as a hotbed of anti-Christian extremism.

See More See Less

Subscribe

Leave us a review, comment or subscribe!

Meet the hosts

discussions

  • I would like to start a dialogue on this topic within the libertarian christian community. Do you believe that the government has a role to play in marriage? i.e. Legalizing same sex marriage or keeping it off the books, or should marriage be between the parties involved and the state has no role to play?

    Jump to Discussion Post 16 replies
  • As I listen to the radio during the weekday I ask myself, Is there (at present) a media-spun consensus to mutate the term “radical” as only meaning an individual who wants to join the religious extremism of Islamic State in Syria? Therefore making people conclude that “radical means Islamic State extremist” and vice versa? As a consequence, I believe other labels associated with the term may also include: contrarian, gadfly, maverick, rebel, and angry young (wo)man. The final goal, in my opinion, to label all these terms as “terrorist,” thus through the fear of this label bring the potential “radical” or any other term back into the collective instinct for a quiet and obedient statist life. Perhaps Christopher Hitchens was correct when he said in his book Letters to a Young Contrarian: “Radical is a useful and honourable term that comes with various health warnings.” (p.1) Of course we cannot forget Rothbard’s definition of the radical: “Radical in the sense of being in total, root-and-branch opposition to the existing political system and to the State itself. Radical in the sense of having integrated intellectual opposition to the State with a gut hatred of its pervasive and organized system of crime and injustice. Radical in the sense of a deep commitment to the spirit of liberty and antistatism that integrates reason and emotion, heart and soul. Furthermore, in contrast to what seems to be true nowadays, you don’t have to be an anarchist to be radical in our sense, just as you can be an anarchist while missing the radical spark.” http://mises.org/library/do-you-hate-state I could be wrong, but perhaps people aren’t being made aware that there are two types of radical. I say this because, again, I use Hitchens book: “Emile Zola could be the pattern for any serious and humanistic radical, because he not only asserted the inalienable rights of the individual, but generalised his assault to encompass the vile role played by clericalism, by racial hatred, by militarism and by the fetishisation of ‘the nation’ and the state.” (p.5)

    Jump to Discussion Post 1 reply
  • Are any of man’s philosophies so different from liberty that they are incompatible? I contend the idea of making such a judgement in itself is unethical. !!! Blog Vs Blog !!! Some say Islam is incompatible with Liberty: http://beingclassicallyliberal.liberty.me/2015/01/10/basic-human-freedoms-are-not-compatible-with-islam I say such assertions themselves are incompatible with Liberty: http://afh.liberty.me/2015/01/12/islam-fear-hatred-intolerance-incompatible-with-freedom/ What do YOU say?

    Jump to Discussion Post 14 replies
  • Reflecting upon my Brazilian pilgrimage to World Youth Day in Rio in August of 2013, I’ve been spending a lot of time reflecting on my journey and the many sights, smells, and sounds I encountered along the way. I began to meditate upon the Stations of the Cross event at Copacabana Beach presided by Pope Francis. Looking back at it, millions of young people were meditating on the sufferings Christ endured as He was led to His death. I started to think of the fact that we were watching Jesus being tortured, and how this should challenge all Christians today. The Stations of the Cross are always deeply challenging and moving. Here is Innocence itself wrongly pronounced guilty, Purity beaten and spat upon, Goodness attacked with the vileness of the world. As we meditate on Christ on the road to Calvary, is it any wonder why we as Christians should stand against torture in all its forms? Our Lord was beaten, whipped, flogged, scourged, humiliated, mocked, and reviled; Our Lord was tortured. It must follow, then, that we who follow Him must enter into His sufferings and work to ensure that they are never inflicted on anyone again. Just as Jesus is in the poor, Jesus is the Tortured One in our world today. When Christians turn a blind eye to torture, or justify it based on our political beliefs or fears, we become the crowd on the morning of Good Friday screaming, “Crucify him! Crucify him!” We become the centurions who inflicted untold suffering on Our Lord. We become the disciples who abandoned Jesus in His hour of need. Christians cannot sit by and accept the existence of torture in society, especially as it exists in our political institutions and how it is propagandized by the mainstream media. In fighting to end torture by refusing to vote for politicians who support torture, we must look to the sufferings of Jesus on the road to Calvary. We must ask our politicians: “Jesus was tortured to death; how can you call yourself pro-life if you support and advocate the tactics that killed our Lord? How can you speak of the dignity of the preborn if you will not defend the dignity of even those we fear? Was not Jesus feared and reviled by the people and political establishment of His day?” I encourage my readers to pray the Stations of the Cross and see Jesus as the Tortured Christ. As you meditate on the Stations, think of the innocent men and women we have tortured at Abu Ghraib, CIA blacksites, and Guantanamo Bay. See Jesus in those who were humiliated, mocked, beaten, and mutilated. Pray for the victims of torture, the conversion of its defenders and perpetrators, and for the resolve to stop torture in all its forms in our society today.

    Jump to Discussion Post 0 replies
  • I’m very excited to see this group!  I think that many Christians are wrestling with the idea of their faith and how it relates to their political outlook–having a ready defense of liberty from a Christian outlook is very important to message these ideas to interested Christians. I don’t know how many of you were able to attend ISFLC, so some of you may have already seen this, but I was able to participate as a panelist with five other young Christian libertarians on the issue of how we, as Christians, approach libertarianism.  We were able to upload the panel to YouTube which you can watch here if you didn’t get to see it already/weren’t at ISFLC. As one of the panelists, I would be happy to hear your feedback on the arguments presented in the panel and/or any other general ideas about how to understand libertarianism from a Christian framework.  What are the best ways to message libertarianism to Christians and Christianity to libertarians?

    Jump to Discussion Post 0 replies