Description

Bronwyn Bruton joins the show to discuss the United States’ continued and unreported war in Somalia, which has created a regional crisis that otherwise wouldn’t exist. Despite constant support and funding from the United States, the Somalian government has no legitimacy or functionality. While the U.S. has been happy to spend taxpayer money, it has relied on African countries neighboring Somalia to do the dirty work fighting Islamic extremists. Bruton then touches on the neighboring countries in the Horn of Africa and why some countries get a pass for their human rights abuses, like in Ethiopia, while others, particularly Eritrea, are demonized. Finally, United States intervention in Northeast Africa has the potential to spiral out of control with a possible ethnic civil war brewing in Ethiopia.

Bruton is the deputy director of the Atlantic Council’s Africa Center. She can be followed on Twitter @BronwynBruton.

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  • It appears to me that one of the biggest drawbacks to the current model of cryptocurrencies is the lack of reversibility in transactions. Historically, third parties such as banks have enabled transactions to be reversed, such as refunds or guaranteeing purchases. I think that if cryptocurrencies want to avoid third parties as much as possible, they should adopt a method for reversing transactions for the purpose of dispute resolution. Thoughts?

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  • Hello, I’ve become quite keen on Jeffrey Rogers Hummel views on inflation. https://fee.org/articles/governments-diminishing-benefits-from-inflation/ That governments don’t get as much cash money as they used to from Seigniorage(money printing)…becuase of some details of the modern banking system. Hummels view is that the US Gov is more likely to actually default on it’s bonds than print it’s way out of it’s financial problems as so many of us libertairans often predict. Any way…. how are people actually calculating the revenue states are getting from seigniorage? There is constant mention to specific statistics in his works on what revenue governments make from printing money…but how are economists attempting to calculate this so exactly? “Almost none of the developed countries could boast seigniorage amounting to more than 1 percent of GDP, despite the fact that the study incorporated the inflationary years of the 1970s. Joseph H. Haslag’s smaller sample of 67 countries over a longer period, 1965 to 1994, finds that seigniorage averaged about 2 percent of total output for the entire sample, ranging from as low as 0.25 percent to as high as 9.98 percent (for Ghana).” However, I’m not smart enough to figure out how this is being calculated? When I Google — I see Seignoarge defined as the cost to money vs what the money is worth. (if it costs 1cent to print a dollar bill than Seigorage is 99cents). Pennies have negative seigniorage — cost the Gov more to mint than 1 cent.) But for the point Hummel is making it seems like a more sophisticated calculation? How did people figure out that for example in WW2 seignorage was 6%? Perhaps this is rather obvious? Thanks! –Luke

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  • @massimomazzone writes: “So, let’s discuss the elephant in the room. A couple of days ago was the anniversary of Oklahoma, was Timothy McVeigh morally justified? I am fed up with this “tactically counter-productive” and other B.S. Was he morally justified? Even if a lot of “dupes” or whatever Spooner called them, were killed, including children? I do not think so, but I would love to see a debate. I grew up in Italy as a Communist Party member when the Red brigades were killing people, personally, I have been vaccinated against violence. What about you guys?” Thoughts?

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  • Who are the money changers? What role have they played in history?

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  • A Penny Doubled Dailey For Thirty Days comes to a Total of $5,368,709 and 12 Cents. 1 .01 2 .02 3 .04 4 .08 5 .16 6 .32 7 .64 8 1.28 9 2.56 10 5.12 11 10.24 12 20.48 13 40.96 14 81.92 15 163.84 16 327.68 17 655.36 18 1,310.72 19 2,621.44 20 5,242.88 21 10,485.76 22 20,971.52 23 41,943.04 24 83,886.08 25 167,772.16 26 335,544.32 27 671,088.64 28 1,342,177.28 29 2,684,354.56 30 5,368,709.12 Is the power of compounding working for you or against you?  Hint: are you paying interest or making interest?

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