Description

Cora Currier, a journalist and reporting fellow at ProPublica, discusses The Intercept‘s investigationof the Obama administration’s kill list of terror suspects in Yemen and Somalia – based on secret military documents.

See More See Less

Subscribe

Leave us a review, comment or subscribe!

Meet the hosts

discussions

  • I am not going to deny this as a new Marine, but the government mafia certainly makes you feel like you’re up there on a special status everywhere you go. It’s similar to being a “Made Man” in the Mafia in every shape or form. And sometimes it makes me feel torn apart because I enjoy it, while at the same time, trying to stick true to my values.   What I mean is that the respect people just give to you when they learn that you’re a Marine. They just literally go the extra mile all of a sudden over the Average Joe next to you. It’s not just that, but also a sense of belonging when you meet someone that just went through training with you, or another Marine on leave that just ran into you. For example: On my way home from Recruit Training last week, I was still in my Dress Blue Delta’s (for those who don’t know, the uniform consists of a white barracks cover (or hat), short khaki shirt, blue pants, and nice shiny black dress shoes). The moment I got out of the car to grab an airport cart for my bags, the security cop (not TSA) waived the $5 fee without question. When I went to check in my baggage, the ticket agent said not to worry about it as it wasn’t required for military members to get paid. At the security line, I was waived through even the PreCheck line without hassle. Waiting for my flight, I met up with two other guys that also just got out of Recruit Training. We weren’t in the same platoons, but instantly connected because of the training. Then another Marine we didn’t even know talked to us and we all soon were having a good time. On my flight home from Los Angeles to Seattle (I flew from San Diego to Los Angeles first), one First Class passenger offered to pay for all my drinks while the airline said that the snacks that I wanted were on the house. I’m not going to lie, all of this felt great when you have people doing that kind of stuff. But I know it was just like “Made Man” rituals of the Mafia and felt uncomfortable at times. For guys out there who’ve done it before, how did you overcome that in order to leave? I have a feeling that besides myself, many liberty minded military guys be it Marines, Army, Navy, whatever, decide to stay because they’re addicted to the respect people give to you. How do you overcome the enjoyments of free drinks, waivers, and the whole nine yards to separate yourself from the machine?

    Jump to Discussion Post 5 replies
  • Suppose a group of Ancaps are on the verge of overthrowing a government somewhere and imposing a libertarian social order. Suppose there was a debate in the US about whether to use the military to help them, stop them, or do nothing. Which do you choose and why?

    Jump to Discussion Post 8 replies
  • First time posting anything to Liberty, but I am in need of advice. I do hope that there is an expert on becoming as invisible as possible on the internet, and using my computer. I have read articles where Microsoft extracts information from your hard drive? Just looking for the safest, and least expensive method of using the technology without having someone over my shoulder constantly making sure I am using it in the prescribed manner. I am sure all of my fellow liberty seekers understand.  

    Jump to Discussion Post 10 replies
  • Decades from now, when the leading political figures of this era are dead or dying and will thus not be prosecuted for anything, classified information from this era will be released. This will show that Ambassador Chris Stevens either knew something, did something, or was about to do something that the Obama regime hated. Killing one’s own ambassador would be political suicide, but when violence broke out in Benghazi, Obama, Clinton, and the rest chose not to let a crisis go to waste.

    Jump to Discussion Post 0 replies
  • The Drone Papers The Intercept has obtained a cache of secret documents detailing the inner workings of the U.S. military’s assassination program in Afghanistan, Yemen, and Somalia. The documents, provided by a whistleblower, offer an unprecedented glimpse into Obama’s drone wars.

    Jump to Discussion Post 1 reply