Description

Joey Lawrence returns to the show to discuss the latest developments in northeast Syria, where the Kurds and Turks are facing off—with the U.S. potentially caught in the middle. Lawrence breaks down the Turkish strategy in the battle against the Kurds, gives his thoughts on the new American bases in Syria, and explains how the Kurds negotiate their relationship with the U.S. and what their longterm goals are. Lawrence then details the Turkish bombing of Syrian Kurdistan. Finally Scott asks what the status is of the Syrian army’s war against Al-Qaeda in the Idlib Province and asks: where have the surviving ISIS fighters gone?

Joey Lawrence is a photographer and director. His three-part documentary on the Kurdish guerrilla is available for free on his site. Follow him on Twitter @joeyldotcom.

Discussed on the show:

BornFromUrgency.com
Afrin (Syria)
People’s Protection Unit (YPG)
Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF)
We Came From Fire, by Joey Lawrence
“Fears over US-Turkey military confrontation in Syria” (Al Jazeera)
Manbij (Syria)
Siege of Kobanî
Idlib
Deir ez-Zor
Al-Nusra Front
This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: Zen Cash, The War State, by Mike Swanson; WallStreetWindow.com; Roberts and Roberts Brokerage Inc.; LibertyStickers.com; TheBumperSticker.com; and ExpandDesigns.com/Scott.

Check out Scott’s Patreon page.

See More See Less

Subscribe

Leave us a review, comment or subscribe!

Meet the hosts

discussions

  • I am not going to deny this as a new Marine, but the government mafia certainly makes you feel like you’re up there on a special status everywhere you go. It’s similar to being a “Made Man” in the Mafia in every shape or form. And sometimes it makes me feel torn apart because I enjoy it, while at the same time, trying to stick true to my values.   What I mean is that the respect people just give to you when they learn that you’re a Marine. They just literally go the extra mile all of a sudden over the Average Joe next to you. It’s not just that, but also a sense of belonging when you meet someone that just went through training with you, or another Marine on leave that just ran into you. For example: On my way home from Recruit Training last week, I was still in my Dress Blue Delta’s (for those who don’t know, the uniform consists of a white barracks cover (or hat), short khaki shirt, blue pants, and nice shiny black dress shoes). The moment I got out of the car to grab an airport cart for my bags, the security cop (not TSA) waived the $5 fee without question. When I went to check in my baggage, the ticket agent said not to worry about it as it wasn’t required for military members to get paid. At the security line, I was waived through even the PreCheck line without hassle. Waiting for my flight, I met up with two other guys that also just got out of Recruit Training. We weren’t in the same platoons, but instantly connected because of the training. Then another Marine we didn’t even know talked to us and we all soon were having a good time. On my flight home from Los Angeles to Seattle (I flew from San Diego to Los Angeles first), one First Class passenger offered to pay for all my drinks while the airline said that the snacks that I wanted were on the house. I’m not going to lie, all of this felt great when you have people doing that kind of stuff. But I know it was just like “Made Man” rituals of the Mafia and felt uncomfortable at times. For guys out there who’ve done it before, how did you overcome that in order to leave? I have a feeling that besides myself, many liberty minded military guys be it Marines, Army, Navy, whatever, decide to stay because they’re addicted to the respect people give to you. How do you overcome the enjoyments of free drinks, waivers, and the whole nine yards to separate yourself from the machine?

    Jump to Discussion Post 5 replies
  • Suppose a group of Ancaps are on the verge of overthrowing a government somewhere and imposing a libertarian social order. Suppose there was a debate in the US about whether to use the military to help them, stop them, or do nothing. Which do you choose and why?

    Jump to Discussion Post 8 replies
  • Whenever a person who opposes the military-industrial complex speaks out against it, neocons predictably say that this person is criticizing the people who are giving him the right to say such things. Hopefully, everyone here knows that this is nonsense, but how best to explain it? I want to write an article on this and make sure I cover all the bases.

    Jump to Discussion Post 2 replies
  • As I listen to the radio during the weekday I ask myself, Is there (at present) a media-spun consensus to mutate the term “radical” as only meaning an individual who wants to join the religious extremism of Islamic State in Syria? Therefore making people conclude that “radical means Islamic State extremist” and vice versa? As a consequence, I believe other labels associated with the term may also include: contrarian, gadfly, maverick, rebel, and angry young (wo)man. The final goal, in my opinion, to label all these terms as “terrorist,” thus through the fear of this label bring the potential “radical” or any other term back into the collective instinct for a quiet and obedient statist life. Perhaps Christopher Hitchens was correct when he said in his book Letters to a Young Contrarian: “Radical is a useful and honourable term that comes with various health warnings.” (p.1) Of course we cannot forget Rothbard’s definition of the radical: “Radical in the sense of being in total, root-and-branch opposition to the existing political system and to the State itself. Radical in the sense of having integrated intellectual opposition to the State with a gut hatred of its pervasive and organized system of crime and injustice. Radical in the sense of a deep commitment to the spirit of liberty and antistatism that integrates reason and emotion, heart and soul. Furthermore, in contrast to what seems to be true nowadays, you don’t have to be an anarchist to be radical in our sense, just as you can be an anarchist while missing the radical spark.” http://mises.org/library/do-you-hate-state I could be wrong, but perhaps people aren’t being made aware that there are two types of radical. I say this because, again, I use Hitchens book: “Emile Zola could be the pattern for any serious and humanistic radical, because he not only asserted the inalienable rights of the individual, but generalised his assault to encompass the vile role played by clericalism, by racial hatred, by militarism and by the fetishisation of ‘the nation’ and the state.” (p.5)

    Jump to Discussion Post 1 reply
  • Regarding this video from @akokesh: LiveLeak.com – The Restraint of Muslims (WARNING: GRAPHIC VIOLENCE) | Adam Kokesh I created a LL account for the first time to get involved in the discussions over there. Pretty interesting responses. Everyone there is assuming Adam is a Muslim or a Jew, or claiming he “forgot” 9/11 (when he referenced it in the video), or calling it “bullshit” without substantiation. I’m interested as to the Lme userbase’s response. Please watch the whole thing before commenting.

    Jump to Discussion Post 7 replies