Description

Scott talks to Tara Copp about her research on cancer rates among military veterans, particularly air force pilots, whose powerful radar systems may be a contributing factor to multiple types of cancers. Copp reminds us that causality is very difficult to establish in complex studies like this, but wants to lay out the astounding numbers of servicemen and women who are contracting and dying from cancer at young ages, many of whom have been exposed to probable carcinogens like depleted uranium and open burn pits. Awareness of these stories is valuable because it may cause the military to investigate some of their own practices more closely.

Discussed on the show:

Tara Copp is the national military and veterans affairs correspondent for McClatchy. She has reported extensively through the Middle East, Asia and Europe to cover defense policy and its impact on the lives of service members. She was previously the Pentagon bureau chief for Military Times and a senior defense analyst for the U.S. Government Accountability Office. She is the author of the award-winning book The Warbird: Three Heroes. Two Wars. One Story.

This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: NoDev NoOps NoIT, by Hussein Badakhchani; The War State, by Mike Swanson; WallStreetWindow.com; Tom Woods’ Liberty ClassroomExpandDesigns.com/ScottWashinton BabylonLiberty Under Attack PublicationsListen and Think AudioTheBumperSticker.com; and LibertyStickers.com.

Donate to the show through PatreonPayPal, or Bitcoin: 1Ct2FmcGrAGX56RnDtN9HncYghXfvF2GAh.

See More See Less

Subscribe

Leave us a review, comment or subscribe!

Meet the hosts

discussions

  • I think this forum needs a thread dedicated to the vices that make us all human and bring pleasure to our everyday lives. Tobacco and alcohol are two of mine. The ways I enjoy tobacco might be worth a conversation: I use tobacco as a snuff. This is milled, often scented, dried tobacco with a body that can range between grits and fine flour. It is a traditional and ancient vice, enjoyed by such persons as Queen Anne and Prince George the Third of England, whilst hated by James the First (or Therrd if yer Scothissh). It is a product gently inhaled into the lower sinuses, which produces a mild burn and rush of nicotine. A tiny tin last a hardened nicotine junkie such as I months at end. It has never induced a case of cancer (likely due to it’s method of manufacture) except for a famous case in which the Welshmen placed snuff into his ear. While the importation of snuff has been slightly impaired by the passing of the PACTA act (Prevent All Cigarette Trafficking Act), the actual product remains at a significant discount to oral and smoked versions of tobacco; while remaining a significant margin of safety to the user. Even the added costs of taxes and air shipping can’t even approach the price of smoked tobacco in the USA. I would never recommend the vice of tobacco to anyone, nor will I recommend snuff to those not currently addicted to nicotine. But if you find yourself in the clutches of tobacco; might I recommend a vice that is economical, safer, traditional, and suitable for both ladies and gentlemen? Please consider snuff as an alternative to oral or smoked tobacco.           pp

    Jump to Discussion Post 29 replies
  • By now almost everyone of us knows about the Silent Night Truce on Christmas Eve 100 years ago this year, where there was a spontaneous truce between German and British soldiers. However, this past weekend the Wall Street Journal had a very insightful article on the subject and how this sort of cooperative behavior isn’t that unusual. Here’s a link to the article if you are interested. http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-spirit-of-the-1914-christmas-truce-1419006906

    Jump to Discussion Post 3 replies