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Tariq Rauf, Director on the Board of Atomic Reporters, Director of the Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Program at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), former Head of Verification and Security Policy Coordination, Office reporting to the Director General, International Atomic Energy Agency, discusses the reality of the IAEA’s procedures for inspecting managed-access sites such as the Parchin military facility in Iran, why he believes the AP relied on a forgery for their recent report claiming Iran would get to inspect itself, and why he agrees with Robert Kelley‘s doubts of the explosives chamber’s existence and use for nuclear weapons research purposes.

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discussions

  • Kick off the discussion on the upcoming guide, Building an Armory from Scratch! Questions, comments, observations or elaborations? Either reply here or create a new discussion using the tag Guide_building-an-armory-from-scratch.

    Jump to Discussion Post 6 replies
  • Here’s a discussion I had yesterday with my accountant. He claims that “we” need to have “legal certainty” to encourage other ti invest in our economy. And that Patents are “legal certainty”. Companies spend large amounts of money and time to do research and to innovate. While others just “copy” what the researchers, the investigators, the investors, generate: new products, new technologies, new medicine, whatever. Therefore, the innovators/investigators/investors will want protection: And if they didn’t have protection of their “creations”, “discoveries”, “inventions” or whatever you’d want to call it, the would not have the INCENTIVE to invest tons of funds on investigation, innovation and research. And therefore there would be no progress. What do you guys think? Your opinion is highly appreciated!

    Jump to Discussion Post 29 replies
  • What do you think of the potential of changing our genes in order to extend our lives? http://www.plosgenetics.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pgen.0040013

    Jump to Discussion Post 0 replies
  • My name Is Kyler, and I was a Marksmanship instructor for the United States Marine corps for over 3 years. While there I was sent to a school on how to teach, and how to develop training courses.  I have taught more people to shoot than I can possibly remember, and after a life time spent around weapons I have come to the conclusion that EVERYONE should have proper training. Even those who do not currently own a weapon and have no intention to do so. The training that can be provided over the internet is limited, but there is still a lot we can do. I have a long list of classes I would be willing to make available/teach, and while I may not be able to go out to the range with you and observe your shooting, if you have a friend record you and you take pictures of your target I can analyze it and do personal coaching with you. I don’t know how open the liberty.me community would be to this idea tho, so please let me know what you think.

    Jump to Discussion Post 9 replies
  • What role (if any) should the gov’t play in the continued funding of cutting-edge scientific research? According to the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and  Development), approximately 10% of all R&D conducted globally is directly funded by governments, with approximately 60% done by private industry and 20% by educational institutions. Granted, this number probably doesn’t take into account indirect gov’t funding through tax subsidies and incentives. That 10% goes towards projects on the cutting edge of science, such as NASAs various space ventures and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (funded through the governments of the member states). Proponents of big gov’t science, such as Neil Degrasse Tyson, have stated in the past that projects like these are unlikely to be privately funded due to their high risk, high cost, and lack of return on investment. Gov’t, claims Tyson, is required to make the initial step and take all the risk so that private firms can follow in its wake with a clear picture of the requirements of such endeavours. TAM 2011: Our Future in Space Would such high risk, high cost projects be possible without gov’t backing?

    Jump to Discussion Post 10 replies