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Entrepreneur and singer-songwriter Tatiana Moroz returns for another edition of The Tatiana Show! Her guest this week is Danny Panzella, producer and director of the documentary Does Pot Cure Cancer?
doespotcurecancer.com

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Meet the hosts

Hey! My name is Tatiana Moroz. I am a passionate singer-songwriter heavily involved in the Libertarian and Bitcoin movement. I have created the first ever artist cryptocurrency Tatiana Coin and also founded an activist talent agency called Same Side Entertainment. I recently launched Crypto Media Hub which is an advertising network for the Bitcoin world and beyond. It's free for advertisers and we work with almost every major media outlet in the space including Bitcoin Magazine, YBitcoin, Bitcoinist, Brave New Coin, Let's Talk Bitcoin, Coin Telegraph and many more.

discussions

  • The internet is full of different ideas on how to pass these drug tests but I am hoping to find out whether someone here has gotten a false negative on one of these tests by diluting their pee properly. This is for a friend of mine who hasn’t smoked in 30 days, and when she did smoke, it was for only 3 days. I’ve read that traces of marijuana have stayed in peoples bodies for upwards of 50 days! She is short and weighs around 130. If anyone has real world experience that involves getting around this sort of thing, it would be greatly appreciated!

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  • I’m an Anesthesiologist and am trying to reach out to other Anesthesiologists in the nation to request their support. This year at the society meeting (over 15K attendees) the ASA has Dr. Michael Portman, an economist, head of the Harvard Business school… as the keynote speaker.  I’d like to counter with an Austrian economist at next year’s conference in Boston.  I’ve corresponded with Tom Woods, and now just need to get the ASA to hear from members and/or attendees, that they’d like the ASA to invite Dr. Woods. I’d be most grateful for any and all help getting ASA members, anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists, anesthesia assistants, to contact the ASA and encourage them to invite Dr. Tom Woods. [email protected] even if you could forward my request to folks you believe may be able to assist, I’d be grateful!   thanks!

    Jump to Discussion Post 9 replies
  • I think this forum needs a thread dedicated to the vices that make us all human and bring pleasure to our everyday lives. Tobacco and alcohol are two of mine. The ways I enjoy tobacco might be worth a conversation: I use tobacco as a snuff. This is milled, often scented, dried tobacco with a body that can range between grits and fine flour. It is a traditional and ancient vice, enjoyed by such persons as Queen Anne and Prince George the Third of England, whilst hated by James the First (or Therrd if yer Scothissh). It is a product gently inhaled into the lower sinuses, which produces a mild burn and rush of nicotine. A tiny tin last a hardened nicotine junkie such as I months at end. It has never induced a case of cancer (likely due to it’s method of manufacture) except for a famous case in which the Welshmen placed snuff into his ear. While the importation of snuff has been slightly impaired by the passing of the PACTA act (Prevent All Cigarette Trafficking Act), the actual product remains at a significant discount to oral and smoked versions of tobacco; while remaining a significant margin of safety to the user. Even the added costs of taxes and air shipping can’t even approach the price of smoked tobacco in the USA. I would never recommend the vice of tobacco to anyone, nor will I recommend snuff to those not currently addicted to nicotine. But if you find yourself in the clutches of tobacco; might I recommend a vice that is economical, safer, traditional, and suitable for both ladies and gentlemen? Please consider snuff as an alternative to oral or smoked tobacco.           pp

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  • Federal Judge May Declare Pot’s Classification As Schedule 1 Narcotic Unconstitutional | Ben Swann Truth In Media Have you ever wondered why it took a constitutional amendment to ban beer but marijuana did not need one?

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  • Hi, I live in Asia, where countries here generally have the most draconian anti-drug laws in the world. It’s not uncommon for people to be executed for non-violent drug crimes (including simple possession of drugs above a certain amount). And the worst part is, a majority of the citizens here actually support such inhumane laws. Whenever there is a news story about people getting caught for selling/smuggling drugs, there is usually an outpour of social media posts/comments calling for them to be given the harshest punishment possible (including the death sentence). As a libertarian, I find this appalling. Just as an example, late last year Jackie Chan’s son (Jaycee) was arrested in Beijing for possession of 100g of marijuana. He faced a possible sentence of up to the death penalty or life imprisonment. Jackie Chan was furious and reportedly refused to help fund his own son’s legal defense! He even said to reporters that, had he known about it, he would have beaten his son to death. And when Jaycee was eventually sentenced to 6 months in prison, many people posted on social media that the sentence was way too light! Part of the reason why people here support such draconian and inhumane drug laws, is because of the “Opium War” narrative. The narrative goes something like this: China was one of the great civilizations in the world. In the 17th & 18th centuries, China was largely self-sufficient and was exporting goods to the rest of the world, accumulating great wealth. But the downfall of the Qing Dynasty was brought about by the British bringing opium into China. The Chinese people got addicted to opium and this was the beginning of China’s decline. The Chinese government tried to stop the import of opium, which led to the Opium Wars, the “Unequal Treaties”, and China’s “Century of Humiliation”. This is why draconian anti-drug laws are justified and necessary, because drugs can lead to the downfall of great nations. I have a hard time persuading people here that drugs should be legalized (or at least decriminalized), because they almost always bring up this narrative as an objection. Can someone help debunk this “Opium War” narrative?

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