Description

Tatiana and Josh interview Laura Lopez of Such Wow TV & Kirsten C. Tynan of The Fully Informed Jury Association

Laura is a Los Angeles-based reality tv editor. She thinks cryptocurrency micropayments are the way forward for content creators and teaches an introductory bitcoin class.

Kirsten is the Executive Director of the The Fully Informed Jury Association (FIJA), an organization focusing on issues involving the role of the jury in our justice system, FIJA seeks to preserve the full function of the jury as the final arbiter in our courts of law by informing everyone about their rights, powers and responsibilities when serving as trial jurors.

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More Info:
www.TatianaMoroz.com
www.CryptoMediaHub.com
www.Vaultoro.com/?a=100068
www.SuchWow.tv
www.fija.org

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Meet the hosts

Hey! My name is Tatiana Moroz. I am a passionate singer-songwriter heavily involved in the Libertarian and Bitcoin movement. I have created the first ever artist cryptocurrency Tatiana Coin and also founded an activist talent agency called Same Side Entertainment. I recently launched Crypto Media Hub which is an advertising network for the Bitcoin world and beyond. It's free for advertisers and we work with almost every major media outlet in the space including Bitcoin Magazine, YBitcoin, Bitcoinist, Brave New Coin, Let's Talk Bitcoin, Coin Telegraph and many more.

discussions

  • Would it be worthwhile advocating for a voluntary state? Now this might seem a contradiction in terms, but consider this: 1) This state would collect voluntary taxation 2) Candidates would be elected by voters to spend the voluntary taxes on ‘public services’ such as welfare, public housing etc., all the goodies progressives want. 3) This state would not have the power to use force in its interactions with citizens Advocating such a system would show that these things can be paid for voluntary, and expose the gun in the room of our current system. Just a thought. Has such an idea ever been proposed? Would it be worthwhile?

    Jump to Discussion Post 6 replies
  • What is the origination of property rights? Where do they come from that you can reason their existence as natural? We usually argue for property rights at some point in our discussions as libertarians, but I’m curious as to where we can claim they’re from. Personally, I derive mine from God and my religious beliefs, similar to what Jefferson stated about God given rights. But what about someone who doesn’t believe in a deity? How can they derive property rights in a way that can’t be dismissed as ideals, but derived in nature? This is also (and arguably more so) important for arguing these natural rights to people who won’t accept a divine aspect. It’s important to have property rights, and they’re evidently beneficial, but the argument remains for declaring these as rights, otherwise the NAP is in jeopardy. How do we have a right to property?

    Jump to Discussion Post 11 replies
  • I look to Our history in the US. I feel that the rights were inborn unto themselves. They are are organic. I dont see it practical nor applicable that a Law creates a Right. At the very least a Law could create a “Privilege.”  But in a society of Libertarian tolerance, there would ideally be few of them. From this logic, one could say that life is a privilege, and we must act accordingly, this obviously conflicts with the slogan, “A right to life.” (Which reminds me, someone who is put to death, do they have the right to life or is life considered a privilege in a death penalty case?) No need to answer this, just thinking out loud. This came from Conservatives ALWAYS ANNOYINGLY SAYING: “We are a nation of laws,” “The Rule of Law.” ect ect ect. This country exists because of Laws. “We have to follow the law because its the Law” Is it possible that Mao Se Teng (sp?) Hitler or Stalin, justified it the same way?

    Jump to Discussion Post 4 replies
  • I was pleasantly surprised this morning to wake up to news that Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, currently the only SCOTUS justice who has ever presided over a jury trial, spoke favorably yesterday about jury nullification and about jurors being informed of this option. Details here: SCOTUS Justice Sotomayor Favors Jury Nullification

    Jump to Discussion Post 0 replies
  • Throughout the year, FIJA will regularly share On This Day in Jury History features, corresponding with the dozens of items on our 2016 Jury Rights Calendar that we do not have room to discuss in detail in print. I thought I’d start a new thread where I can share these items for discussion.

    Jump to Discussion Post 1 reply