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Tim continues to catch up with the news as he addresses the US withdrawal from Syria amid a Turkish invasion – a move that had both Republicans and Democrats fuming. He also speaks on the Catholic church’s objection to statutory charges with regards to priests abusing children. What else? We’re just playing catch up. Tune in and find out!

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Meet the hosts

I am the CEO of Preuss Media LLC as well as a 20-something political commentator, blogger, talker, musician, bookworm, and weight lifter. Although lacking a formal college degree (something I boast about), my strange brain contains a wealth of knowledge of economics, political science, and philosophy.

discussions

  • Our current voting method is to pick the “best” candidate from a slate of candidates.  You only get to pick one, even if several of them are qualified.  Many times people don’t even bother researching or voting for candidates they would consider qualified because they don’t belong to the duopoly of Democrats and Republicans.  They reason that votes cast for candidates bound to lose are “wasted”, so voting for the less corrupt thug might make our future suffering easier to bear.  In my opinion, this mentality is the most responsible culprit for the last 100+ years of executive and legislative folly. This tragic circumstance can be eliminated immediately with the adoption of approval voting.  In this method, instead of choosing a single candidate from the slate, you express your feelings about each candidate, approving only those who you feel qualified with a yes or up vote.  The candidate approved by the highest percentage of voters is declared the most qualified and wins the office. This simple voting method levels the playing field!  Approval voting allows for more competitive elections, and would certainly destroy the two party duopoly of American politics.  Independent and third party candidates would no longer battle the “wasted vote”  stigma and can focus on communicating their values and message to the voters.  And seeing a more fair election process would likely increase voter participation rate. There are many interesting details of approval voting to discuss, and the potential ramifications are very exciting as well.  What do you think?

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  • “The whole business of authority is to interfere in other people’s business.  Princes and priests can never resist imposing restrictions.” – P. J. O’Rourke, On the Wealth of Nations

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  • As I listen to the radio during the weekday I ask myself, Is there (at present) a media-spun consensus to mutate the term “radical” as only meaning an individual who wants to join the religious extremism of Islamic State in Syria? Therefore making people conclude that “radical means Islamic State extremist” and vice versa? As a consequence, I believe other labels associated with the term may also include: contrarian, gadfly, maverick, rebel, and angry young (wo)man. The final goal, in my opinion, to label all these terms as “terrorist,” thus through the fear of this label bring the potential “radical” or any other term back into the collective instinct for a quiet and obedient statist life. Perhaps Christopher Hitchens was correct when he said in his book Letters to a Young Contrarian: “Radical is a useful and honourable term that comes with various health warnings.” (p.1) Of course we cannot forget Rothbard’s definition of the radical: “Radical in the sense of being in total, root-and-branch opposition to the existing political system and to the State itself. Radical in the sense of having integrated intellectual opposition to the State with a gut hatred of its pervasive and organized system of crime and injustice. Radical in the sense of a deep commitment to the spirit of liberty and antistatism that integrates reason and emotion, heart and soul. Furthermore, in contrast to what seems to be true nowadays, you don’t have to be an anarchist to be radical in our sense, just as you can be an anarchist while missing the radical spark.” http://mises.org/library/do-you-hate-state I could be wrong, but perhaps people aren’t being made aware that there are two types of radical. I say this because, again, I use Hitchens book: “Emile Zola could be the pattern for any serious and humanistic radical, because he not only asserted the inalienable rights of the individual, but generalised his assault to encompass the vile role played by clericalism, by racial hatred, by militarism and by the fetishisation of ‘the nation’ and the state.” (p.5)

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  • Advent is the most counter cultural of the Church’s Liturgical seasons. The world is all about Santa Claus, “Christmas” music, Rudolph, buying presents, decorations everywhere, swamped malls, and Holiday parties with the office/ neighbors you don’t like all that much… And the Church dresses itself in penitential purple, it sings songs of expectation, it meditates on the Last Things, the Gloria is fasted from… and rather than looking to a jolly fat man holding presents; She looks to an expectant Mary who bears the Greatest Gift within her womb, waiting to burst forth into our lives. Advent is a beautiful season because it calls us to withdraw and re-center ourselves.  Don’t let Christmas Day find you completely exhausted and fed up with all things Christmas.  Enter into the mystery, enter into the longing, and enter into the waiting that is Advent.

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  • Reflecting upon my Brazilian pilgrimage to World Youth Day in Rio in August of 2013, I’ve been spending a lot of time reflecting on my journey and the many sights, smells, and sounds I encountered along the way. I began to meditate upon the Stations of the Cross event at Copacabana Beach presided by Pope Francis. Looking back at it, millions of young people were meditating on the sufferings Christ endured as He was led to His death. I started to think of the fact that we were watching Jesus being tortured, and how this should challenge all Christians today. The Stations of the Cross are always deeply challenging and moving. Here is Innocence itself wrongly pronounced guilty, Purity beaten and spat upon, Goodness attacked with the vileness of the world. As we meditate on Christ on the road to Calvary, is it any wonder why we as Christians should stand against torture in all its forms? Our Lord was beaten, whipped, flogged, scourged, humiliated, mocked, and reviled; Our Lord was tortured. It must follow, then, that we who follow Him must enter into His sufferings and work to ensure that they are never inflicted on anyone again. Just as Jesus is in the poor, Jesus is the Tortured One in our world today. When Christians turn a blind eye to torture, or justify it based on our political beliefs or fears, we become the crowd on the morning of Good Friday screaming, “Crucify him! Crucify him!” We become the centurions who inflicted untold suffering on Our Lord. We become the disciples who abandoned Jesus in His hour of need. Christians cannot sit by and accept the existence of torture in society, especially as it exists in our political institutions and how it is propagandized by the mainstream media. In fighting to end torture by refusing to vote for politicians who support torture, we must look to the sufferings of Jesus on the road to Calvary. We must ask our politicians: “Jesus was tortured to death; how can you call yourself pro-life if you support and advocate the tactics that killed our Lord? How can you speak of the dignity of the preborn if you will not defend the dignity of even those we fear? Was not Jesus feared and reviled by the people and political establishment of His day?” I encourage my readers to pray the Stations of the Cross and see Jesus as the Tortured Christ. As you meditate on the Stations, think of the innocent men and women we have tortured at Abu Ghraib, CIA blacksites, and Guantanamo Bay. See Jesus in those who were humiliated, mocked, beaten, and mutilated. Pray for the victims of torture, the conversion of its defenders and perpetrators, and for the resolve to stop torture in all its forms in our society today.

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