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This is episode 202 of You, Me, and BTC – your liberty and Bitcoin podcast.
Let’s say something honest: Everyone desperately wants to go broke. We dream about it day and night. “What would life be like if I had no money whatsoever?” we ask ourselves.
So on today’s show, we’ll share some tips that could help you waste every precious cent you own. Blowing cash is not as easy as it sounds but if you tune in and listen carefully, you’ll learn the absolute best ways to successfully devastate your wallet.
This episode truly has it all – everything from the ongoing Mt. Gox debacle to fake tulip mania to “other” Bitcoins. Catch the livestream tonight at 9PM Eastern and check the list below for some of the specific stories we’ll cover!
Special Report: Twice burned – How Mt. Gox’s bitcoin customers could lose again
There Never Was a Real Tulip Fever
Insane Coin Offerings: Everything is “Bitcoin”
Politics, Religion, and Bitcoin (Cash)
Your hosts this week are Daniel Brown, Tim Baker, and Zack Voell. Don’t forget to scroll down so you can keep up with our open tweet lines, vote in this week’s Bitcoin poll, and share your thoughts in the comments!
Every click helps. If this Bitcoin podcast was interesting, entertaining, obnoxious, or anything else, use the share buttons to let others know that it exists.
We’d also like to thank this episode’s sponsor, Americas Cardroom. Head here and use code BTC100 for your special welcome package!
Tips appreciated: 1Kiy8x4pwMS7RQuH7xDeVcfqeup7gUTqA
The #YMBLive Open Tweet Lines
If you have a comment, a question, or a Bitcoin headline that you’d like us to cover on the air, use the button below to send us a tweet! The tweet lines are open all week long, so you can send a shoutout even when we’re not live and we’ll still get to it during the show. We’ll do our best to read all #YMBLive tweets on the air and respond to any questions.

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discussions

  • It appears to me that one of the biggest drawbacks to the current model of cryptocurrencies is the lack of reversibility in transactions. Historically, third parties such as banks have enabled transactions to be reversed, such as refunds or guaranteeing purchases. I think that if cryptocurrencies want to avoid third parties as much as possible, they should adopt a method for reversing transactions for the purpose of dispute resolution. Thoughts?

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  • Silsal, as the venture is titled, utilizes an electronic blockchain record framework to give full load perceivability and streamline exchange streams and supply chains. Whenever tried effectively, the Silsal blockchain task hopes to mechanize the trade, ID, and affirmation of load reports between Abu Dhabi ports and Belgium’s Port of Antwerp. Every partner demonstrations like a hub of a blockchain organize who gets the chance to get to and recognize the ongoing store network of the transported things. Abu Dhabi Ports has collaborated with its Belgian partner to start a blockchain-fueled production network pilot venture. News Source: TheCoinRepublic

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  •   Weixing Chen and Yang Jun, the two Chinese entrepreneurs are pairing up to launch a blockchain based ride hailing app. However, the plan is to offer different life-style services that include ride hailing and deliveries. Read news here: Blockchain Based Ride Hailing App

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  • Hello, I’ve become quite keen on Jeffrey Rogers Hummel views on inflation. https://fee.org/articles/governments-diminishing-benefits-from-inflation/ That governments don’t get as much cash money as they used to from Seigniorage(money printing)…becuase of some details of the modern banking system. Hummels view is that the US Gov is more likely to actually default on it’s bonds than print it’s way out of it’s financial problems as so many of us libertairans often predict. Any way…. how are people actually calculating the revenue states are getting from seigniorage? There is constant mention to specific statistics in his works on what revenue governments make from printing money…but how are economists attempting to calculate this so exactly? “Almost none of the developed countries could boast seigniorage amounting to more than 1 percent of GDP, despite the fact that the study incorporated the inflationary years of the 1970s. Joseph H. Haslag’s smaller sample of 67 countries over a longer period, 1965 to 1994, finds that seigniorage averaged about 2 percent of total output for the entire sample, ranging from as low as 0.25 percent to as high as 9.98 percent (for Ghana).” However, I’m not smart enough to figure out how this is being calculated? When I Google — I see Seignoarge defined as the cost to money vs what the money is worth. (if it costs 1cent to print a dollar bill than Seigorage is 99cents). Pennies have negative seigniorage — cost the Gov more to mint than 1 cent.) But for the point Hummel is making it seems like a more sophisticated calculation? How did people figure out that for example in WW2 seignorage was 6%? Perhaps this is rather obvious? Thanks! –Luke

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  • Intro- Blockchain basics: business ledgers Classes coming <p style=”text-align: left;”> https://developer.ibm.com/courses/all-courses/blockchain-for-developers/</p>

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