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This is episode 117 of You, Me, and BTC – your liberty and Bitcoin podcast! Apologies for the delay on this one. Easter set us back a bit.
This is another one of those darned philosophical episodes. You’re about to hear us ask way too many questions and provide way too few answers, but heck, we had fun. John kicks things off with some thoughts about opting out of the system. Is it morally necessary? Or does the risk of punishment make it acceptable for us to tolerate and appease our oppressors?
Then all that will get us going on taxes. If we assume that taxes result in force, violence, and murder, is it wrong to pay them? What if we add the assumption that we are basically slaves to the government? Does that mean we’re not responsible for those sins because we are forced to pay taxes? Is it still commendable NOT to pay them?
Like we said, lots of questions – and this is just the beginning. Tune in for a crazy show! Your hosts are Daniel Brown, Tim Baker, and John Stuart. Enjoy!
Leave a comment and tell us if you think it’s wrong to pay taxes!
We’d also like to thank this episode’s sponsor, LuckyBit.
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discussions

  • I debated whether or not this should be posted in the history discussion category as today may indeed go down as a tipping point in the game of government intimidation. Could we bee too hopeful to think that the next significant confrontation could be with the bureaucracy everyone loves to hate?

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  • The “Tax Honesty” movement has demonstrated a few things to a lot of people.  To cover a lot with a few words, I’ll put it this way:  The IRS breaks its own rules in order to rob us through deceit. Some people (Irwin Schiff, for example) have suffered because they attempted to protect themselves from the rule-breakers.  There is now a theory popular among liberty-minded people that the government is too corrupt and powerful for anyone to succeed in an effort like Irwin Schiff’s.  There is also some good evidence showing this theory to be wrong.  It’s available at Peter Hendrickson’s website, losthorizons.com. I think that a lot of bureaucrats feel and believe that they are helping society.  This leaves them open to consider fixing situations in which their bureaucracy is breaking its own rules.  And let’s face it, there are some rules that can actually help liberty.  Perhaps the loads of evidence that Hendrickson has on his site can be explained by the presence of such “good-hearted” individuals in the bowels of the IRS. In any case, if you can, please entertain the possibility that the US Income Tax is not being administered honestly.  Consider that maybe, just maybe, in the gargantuan tangle of words called “Title 26,” the legal meaning of the law as it applies to most people is not coercive at all.  Maybe, if it were properly applied, the government would be a nuisance like neighbors who let their dogs poop on your lawn, instead of a nuisance like cancer in your lungs.  It could be true.  I think it is true, and I think that failing to follow all the twists and turns that Hendrickson uncovered to see for yourself that it is true kind of justifies you still being enslaved to a government that steals from you in order to cause havoc all over the planet in a massive deception that justifies its existence. If we want to honor the goodness in all people, including those who have been tricked into serving evil, we can do so by understanding the rules they think they should be following, and using them to protect ourselves from enslavement.

    Jump to Discussion Post 39 replies
  • Silsal, as the venture is titled, utilizes an electronic blockchain record framework to give full load perceivability and streamline exchange streams and supply chains. Whenever tried effectively, the Silsal blockchain task hopes to mechanize the trade, ID, and affirmation of load reports between Abu Dhabi ports and Belgium’s Port of Antwerp. Every partner demonstrations like a hub of a blockchain organize who gets the chance to get to and recognize the ongoing store network of the transported things. Abu Dhabi Ports has collaborated with its Belgian partner to start a blockchain-fueled production network pilot venture. News Source: TheCoinRepublic

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  •   Weixing Chen and Yang Jun, the two Chinese entrepreneurs are pairing up to launch a blockchain based ride hailing app. However, the plan is to offer different life-style services that include ride hailing and deliveries. Read news here: Blockchain Based Ride Hailing App

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  • It can be a challenge to keep up with all the taxes one needs to pay throughout the year, and than to deal with all the paperwork that needs to be filed can be frustrating. What would be a good way to simplify the Tax Code? Below is a list of some of the taxes that we the people need to pay, or at least we experience their effects at one time or another. -Medicare, Medicare, Social Security, Federal Inocme Tax, State tax, Local Tax, Corporate tax, Sales Tax, Property Tax, estate tax, alcohol tax, tobacco tax, gift tax, tariffs on imports and exports, etc. Would a simple flat or consumption tax do the trick?

    Jump to Discussion Post 2 replies