What is the next important task for feminism?

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What is the next important task for feminism?

  • Laurie Rice

    This year (2014), the New Hampshire Liberty forum hosted a discussion with Naomi Wolf, Karen Straughan, Antigone Darling, and moderator Carla Gericke. Near the end (link: http://youtu.be/5z7nteHMPJ8?t=48m30s) Jeffrey Tucker posed an interesting question: “What is left for feminism to do?” Antigone Darling had an interesting answer, to abolish or chip away at the FDA, citing it as an institution that prevents women from accessing the products on the market that would be helpful to them, particularly products connected to reproductive control. I’ve recently written an article about the FDA and emergency contraception, here:
    (https://rice.liberty.me/2014/05/27/contraception-and-free-market-feminism/) Do you guys agree? What do YOU think should be the next task for feminism?

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  • Nicholas J. Evans

    Due to the observations I’ve made of many feminists and the feminist movement in general, I was not really interested in joining the group when I initially received the invite. But after reading what you had to say, I happily admit that I find this topic interesting as the FDA does enforce anti-women regulations.

    The flaw I see with the feminist naming is that the FDA not only enforces anti-women regulations, but it also enforces anti-male regulations. People of all ages, genders, ethnicities, and backgrounds are victims of the FDA.

    The potential that I see is that feminists — who tend to be very liberal — could be given a healthy dose of the reality of government involvement in people’s lives. I stress people, because if this movement is to be successful then the members of the feminist movement must understand that it isn’t just anti-women regulations but anti-people regulations. It must be taught that the answer to the FDA problem isn’t to simply repeal regulations that prevent women from accessing emergency contraception; the answer is that the FDA shouldn’t exist thus preventing any person from accessing what it is that they think is best for themselves in times of emergency.

    As odd as that may sound, infiltrating the feminist movement by implementing free market economics and exposing the state as the real threat to people’s health, especially women’s health in this case, sounds fantastic to me.

    The end should be to teach the abstract lesson that government regulation harms the health of all people, and the means could be by showing  primarily concrete examples of how womens health is harmed not helped by the state. With secondary examples of regulations that effect males, people with certain illness’s, etc.

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    Winter Trabex

    I can’t really answer this question without sharing my own personal experience.

    When I went to college, I was overjoyed to find that there were groups- however small- who advocated for personal freedom and individual choice in the lives of women. Though the feminist group consisted of our three of four people (one of which was myself), I kept at it because I clearly saw that women were being oppressed. Further, I recognized that something had to be done about it.

    The most we could accomplish in college was to spread knowledge around. We went to a gathering in the state capital about abortion, but I can’t tell if we had a positive effect or not.

    In the years since I left college, I have discovered that many people who call themselves feminists- who I respected greatly- have not come to the same conclusions I have. Namely, that government is the cause of the majority of society’s problems. To remedy inequality across gender lines requires a new sort of thinking.

    Instead of asking permission from the government to do anything (voting, abortion, birth control, etc) feminists should be more focused on why they are disbarred from choosing whatever path they may choose regardless of legality. The greatest task for feminism will be to speak about the inequality and inequity of law, in order to show that voting never got women anywhere, that a victory in the Supreme Court for abortion was only temporary and that no matter how many points feminists score today, a reversal in fortune is always possible so long as the government is involved.

    Thus, anyone who wishes to be free must claim freedom for themselves, rather than pressing an institution established and maintained through the use of violence and coercion for privileges denied to them in consequence of the institution’s existence in the first place.

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