Star Wars: A philosophic analysis of liberty and tyranny?

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Star Wars: A philosophic analysis of liberty and tyranny?

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  • Jonathan Gillispie

    As a Star Wars fan, I’ve long been fascinated with the subtle messages it transmits about the tyranny, war and liberty. Say what you think about it.

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  • John Faust

    I think there is a very interesting analysis to be made.  You have a group fighting against an elected tyrant who used the force of government to force an entire galaxy to submit to his will.  It is easy to see the republic or the rebels as the good guys, but the Jedi were elite government soldiers.  The trade federation was interesting as well.  Were they a union or more of a market for services? Was the blockade on Naboo a formal protest of their goods?  I mean, what was the nature of the blockade?  All important questions.

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      Jonathan Gillispie

      Read the novel Darth Plagueis. It sets up all the groundwork that leads up to the Clone Wars and the ultimate formation of the Empire with the annihilation of the Jedi Order.

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      Jonathan Gillispie

      Another interesting thing is the Intergalactic Banking Clan which kind of reminds me of the Federal Reserve.

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    Jonathan Gillispie

    Barack Obama is very much like Emperor Sidious than most would realize. In fact my twitter avatar is a photoshop of Obama’s face over Sidious’s body. I call it Emperor Obama (and is my page name too). Think about it; narcissistic, power hungry, elitist, arrogant and takes power away from the legislative branch to implement his agenda pieces that won’t get passed through Congress.

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    Brian David

    Another angle is the contrast between the philosophies of the Light Side and the Dark Side of the Force.

    The Jedi preach and crusade against egoism, worldly attachments, and the drawing strength from human passions, which are supposed to be the characteristics of the Dark Side of the Force. But I say that these things are the very gist of life itself and are nothing to be ashamed of. So from this perspective, long live the Dark Side!

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      Jonathan Gillispie

      Suppose that’s one way of looking at things. Though the Jedi philosophy has its high point despite of its potential flaws such as thinking clearly, keeping cool headed, caring and helping other people other as well as guarding peace, justice and liberty. Though it can be argued the Jedi in the prequel era strayed from all those.

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        John Faust

        That is really where it becomes a problem though, right?  I mean, in some ways, how can you fault the Jedi in their goodie goodie truth justice and order type of thing.  When you look at it again, you start to realize that it is their order that they are enforcing.  They are very interested in making galactic civilizations “be good” as well.  I mean, did Dooku’s group have the right to succeed?  It didn’t seem as though they were trying to take over the galaxy as much as carve out a new area just for them.  But I may be wrong

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