How to get over Statism Comforts

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How to get over Statism Comforts

  • Daniel Vu

    I am not going to deny this as a new Marine, but the government mafia certainly makes you feel like you’re up there on a special status everywhere you go. It’s similar to being a “Made Man” in the Mafia in every shape or form. And sometimes it makes me feel torn apart because I enjoy it, while at the same time, trying to stick true to my values.

     

    What I mean is that the respect people just give to you when they learn that you’re a Marine. They just literally go the extra mile all of a sudden over the Average Joe next to you. It’s not just that, but also a sense of belonging when you meet someone that just went through training with you, or another Marine on leave that just ran into you.

    For example: On my way home from Recruit Training last week, I was still in my Dress Blue Delta’s (for those who don’t know, the uniform consists of a white barracks cover (or hat), short khaki shirt, blue pants, and nice shiny black dress shoes). The moment I got out of the car to grab an airport cart for my bags, the security cop (not TSA) waived the $5 fee without question. When I went to check in my baggage, the ticket agent said not to worry about it as it wasn’t required for military members to get paid. At the security line, I was waived through even the PreCheck line without hassle.

    Waiting for my flight, I met up with two other guys that also just got out of Recruit Training. We weren’t in the same platoons, but instantly connected because of the training. Then another Marine we didn’t even know talked to us and we all soon were having a good time.

    On my flight home from Los Angeles to Seattle (I flew from San Diego to Los Angeles first), one First Class passenger offered to pay for all my drinks while the airline said that the snacks that I wanted were on the house.

    I’m not going to lie, all of this felt great when you have people doing that kind of stuff. But I know it was just like “Made Man” rituals of the Mafia and felt uncomfortable at times.

    For guys out there who’ve done it before, how did you overcome that in order to leave? I have a feeling that besides myself, many liberty minded military guys be it Marines, Army, Navy, whatever, decide to stay because they’re addicted to the respect people give to you.

    How do you overcome the enjoyments of free drinks, waivers, and the whole nine yards to separate yourself from the machine?

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  • Liam






    We’ll, at least you saved $5 at the airport!

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      Will Davis

      I don’t get the point you are trying to make.

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    Daniel Lee

    I think what you should remember is that the decision you made and honorable service will be something you carry forever.

    Sure, when you get out, there will be some who will not give you free stuff or discounts on account of your veteran status.  However, there will be people who continue to show you difference.  I find that, when talking about those who give these discounts, the difference is between Statists and those who are not are made rapidly apparent after you leave. Then you will begin to see the difference between patriots and loyalists.

    A Statist will only give these honors to someone currently serving or retired.

    As far as the decision to leave, for me it was pretty simple.  My cardiovascular system, neck, and brain injuries preclude me from continuing to serve.  Remember that whatever respect that was given to you because of your occupation is a hallow one.  Think of it like being a shitbag officer and how they still get respect for the rank but not the person.

    Try to be the type of person who commands respect by virtue of caliber of character and actions rather than one who gets reverence by virtue of position within the legions of the Imperium.  I think you’ll find, as you develop your character, knowledge, and experience, that the respect you were given as a Marine is hallow and cheap.  It was given to you, mostly, so that the plebs do not have to face the facts that it is because of them the above images* were possible.

    Going along with the Enemy without resisting is just as damning as anything we have done or the sociopaths at the Imperial city ordered.

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    Will Davis

    Earn it.

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    Josh Wells

    Daniel try this mental exercise. Think of those people you have known who were the most virtuous and deserving of respect. How many of them sought out the respect of others or allowed themselves to be flattered by it when it was received? Those individuals I’ve known who were the most honorable and respected all shared the common trait of humility. And not a phony humility intended to generate more praise upon themselves but a genuine humility. I think this comes naturally from people who are in tune with their own fallibility, imperfections and short comings as humans. The ancient philosophers said “know thyself”. Well those who do know better than anyone else their own flaws and hence know better than to seek out praise from others. Plus they are mature enough not to need that.

     

    I suspect that if you are here you understand that many Americans carry a romanticized view of the military which is largely due to State propaganda. If you know that then you know the respect shown as well intended as it may be is misplaced. And what kind of a person desires or appreciates misplaced respect? Someone in the military may be a virtuous person but putting on a uniform and swearing an oath of loyalty to the State doesn’t make it so.

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