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  • Matt Phillips

    Well it seems that there is a much larger group of gamers represented on Liberty.me than outdoorsy types. But that’s ok. Usually, people who like to spend a day or two in the wild don’t have any  issues with small crowds or being alone anyway.

     

    My passion is wilderness backpacking, but it bleeds over into photography, fishing, and paddling. I’m looking to find more excuses to get outdoors, so it’ll be nice to hear about other peoples’ interests.

     

    Where this crosses with Liberty, I haven’t fully figured out yet. But since liberty minded people seem to be some of the nicer and smarter people that I deal with on a daily basis, I thought that we might have a lot to offer one another on a myriad of subjects, including outdoor recreation. But I’m game if discussions arise surrounding land, water, and wildlife management.

    Anyway, even the residents of the digital city on the cloud need to ground themselves in a beautiful setting on terra firma from time to time.

     

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  • Matt Phillips

    Also, the avatar used for this group is a photo from a hike that I did at Grand Teton National Park in 2007. I highly recommend the hike to Lake Solitude from Jenny Lake if you only have a day. But start early.

    If you have a couple of days and you like to backpack, make a loop out of one or two of the adjoining trails.

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    Richard Masta

    great idea for a group! there is definitely a strain of L.me’ers who are outdoor enthusiasts.

    I live a stone’s throw from New Hampshire’s White Mountains and Lakes Region and I sneak up there whenever I can. Particular fond of the Sandwich Range Wilderness and Ethan Pond areas, myself…

    I think we can experience liberty in the most remote places on earth solely because they are where the state is least powerful (even if you pass a sign that tells you you’re on federal land..so what!).

    I like the little Thoreau quip about being “nature looking into nature” and I sure feel that way when I’m out and about. Camping, hiking, intently watching animals in stillness and silence, biking…I’m going to dabble more in foraging and gold panning this summer, and I might buy a raft so I can set sail on the lazy river and pass the time away. I look forward to the goings-on this group will offer!

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    Matt Phillips

    I’ve been trying to convince some friends to do the White Mountains segment of the AT with me, or just a nice 3-5 day loop made out of some trails within the national forest. I’ll definitely hit you up for ideas and/or company if it pans out.

    Heck, if it doesn’t pan out I might just head out there on my own one of these days.

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      Richard Masta

      Feel free. I’ve hiked most of it in pieces, but not the entire stretch at once.

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    Roger Browne

    …Where this crosses with Liberty, I haven’t fully figured out yet…

    Oh, that’s easy! When you go overnight hiking in the untracked wilderness, you enjoy (temporarily) a state of pure anarchy.

    Your little group makes all their own decisions peacefully, without force or fraud. If a disagreement cannot be resolved, the ultimate fallback is mutiny: for one subgroup to break away and go their own way, peacefully.

    In the wilderness you can say what you like without the state objecting or even knowing. You can interact freely with the others in your group, without fear or favor.

    There’s usually a “leader” of the group, but their status comes from respect rather than violence.

    There aren’t so many wildernesses anymore where you can go where you like, camp where you like, and light a fire or catch a fish if you wish. But these places still do exist and are wonderful for the soul.

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      Richard Masta

      well said! haha, mutiny = leaving your friends in the dust and sitting on the summit for an hour waiting, hoping they’re not dead.

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    Toni Sopocko

    Oh, it crosses with liberty a LOT these days.  I used to back pack a LOT when I was young.  Lived in a tent for 4 months at one point.  But now our outdoor activities tend to be of the motorized variety: the hub is an AVID dirt bike rider, we both ski, and though I wouldn’t really call it hiking, we spend a lot of time wandering around in the woods and at the beach.  We haul the little trailer somewhere at least once a month to go camping, usually in the middle of the Nevada desert somewhere.

    The liberty question is the ever encroaching restriction of public lands by the Federal government.  Here we are experiencing it very sharply.  In the past several years, many of my husband’s favorite riding grounds have been “taken” by the BLM or the Forest Service, usually in the name of “conservation”.  We were getting alarmed by how much was being restricted, so started attending the meetings and interacting with people who knew more about the situations than we did.  And we’ve learned that there is VERY little science behind the actions of the government, and nearly all of it seems to be about statist control, not environmental conservation.   It seems to me that the better solution would be for the Feds to sell all these restricted “public” lands to private individuals (or at least to the states they’re in) and allow them to be managed locally, maybe even (imagine!) at a profit!

    Anyhow, enough ranting for now.  I look forward to reading about other folks’ adventures out in the wilds of this beautiful country.  So much to do!

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    Matt Phillips

    It’s funny; I’ve actually had conversations that go something like this:

    Me: “So you think that without a government police presence, or written statutes against murder, everyone would just run around killing one another?”

    Them: “Yeah, sort of.”

    Me: “Remind me not to do any wilderness backpacking with you.”

    Them: “Why? Oh… Well I wouldn’t…”

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