Exuberant youth

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Exuberant youth

  • Toni Sopocko

    So, after spending a few weeks here at L.me, I find myself fascinated by the fact that I am fiercely outnumbered by people who are young enough to be my kids and, even more so, my grand kids.  It’s awesome.  When I was young, EVERYONE who was cool was a socialist.  Libertarians were outcasts.

    HOW did this happen?  The number of young, educated, dedicated libertarians here astounds me!  Tell me your stories!

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    • Ryan Liberty Fox Carr

      I’m rather new here as well, but I will gladly tell you my story. My name is Ryan and I am 17 years old. I currently identify as libertarian anarchist. How did I come to libertarianism? It was more through my own research online and social media (especially facebook) then anything else. Both my parents were neo-cons, so I grew up to despise the vast majority of the Republican Party. However, I live in a college town and am well aware of how the extremely liberal policies have affected the area for the worse. Needless to say, I did not care for politics at all until I was heard about independent voting and eventually to libertarianism from The Libertarian Party’s Facebook page as well as reading a plethora of articles on Wikipedia.  I was already leaning towards minarchism, but this research helped me on the track to becoming a full minarchist. About 4 months later, after many more discoveries, I became an anarchist, although I am still a libertarian at heart.

      In conclusion, libertarianism is reaching the masses much more rapidly and more efficiently through the internet and more kids these days are aware that the political system is very corrupt and does not care for them at all. Also, more years of both democrats and republicans in power have proven that nothing changes underneath them.  Thus, many of the more active and brighter kids pursue and think about alternatives to the current system.

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        Toni Sopocko

        Yay!  My heart swells.

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      Matt Gilliland

      I find that most of my peers (I’m 25) came in through Ron Paul, though I came in through free online resources from FEE and LvMI.

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      David Pennisi

      My first post in a group 😀 yay!

      I’m in my mid to late 20’s. I grew up in a rather conservative family though politics weren’t always discussed. For me it was always more about social philosophy than it was practical politics. My family, and I, for a short time voted partly line just because voting was the thing to do and I guess with little thought the republican party was ideally supposed to be a big umbrella encompassing at least some of what I related to. The first time I was aware of Ron Paul I thought his followers were crazy (no offense) and like I said my philosophies on living life were separate from politics so at that time I didn’t think to listen too much. At the point where I was trying to think more about who and what to vote for I started to become really disillusioned. When Rand won the senate seat I started to take notice a little. I think it was listening to his acceptance speech that got me looking into the Pauls. A little after that I moved to a state where politics mattered a little more. During the last presidential election cycle I campaigned for Ron a bit. I previously never campaigned before and it felt really weird to me both philosophically and socially. It felt as if I was a Jehovah’s Witness or Mormon Missionary (no offense to them), this coming from a Religion/Philosophy undergrad. Seeing politics up close and personal turned me way off again and experiencing being cognizant of the questions one should ask themselves in participating in politics drove me deeper into my philosophy. Being involved last time was my last stitch in trying to see any value in any type of statism.

      I feel, in the end, that I in some way transcended politics into the social philosophies of individualism and anarchy. That is where I am now. Working on being aware of and defining my thoughts and trying to work out how to live them out practically.

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      Alexander Butler

      Hi Tony!

      I’m Alex and I am a 16 year old individualist anarchist. I discovered libertarianism, like many, through Ron Paul by watching the 2012 Republican primaries. I’ve always had kind of a libertarian bent, so he just put a name to the feelings I had for as long as I can remember. After Ron Paul lost, I drifted around the Republican Party for a while but I never truly belonged. I guess Ron Paul was just a one of a kind candidate in the GOP, so eventually I left. I ALMOST joined the Democratic Party until I found the Libertarian Party through Robert Sarvis, one of the gubernatorial candidates in my state. After a couple months of campaigning for the LP I stumbled across a Stefan Molyneux video while I was surfing the internet one night. That’s when I discovered anarchism as a legitimate ideal. It’s all history from there.

      The internet has played a major role in the rise of youth libertarians. Young people utilize the internet like no other age group, so it’s no surprise that the political movement with the strongest online support also has a strong youth backing.

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      Michael Bunch

      Skipping the life story….

      I’m 27 and came to be the voluntary thinker that I am now because I ran the gamut of political philosophy. I’ve always been very individualistic but my thinking of how to protect the individual has radically changed over time. When I was in high school and in the military, I was somewhat totalitarian because a nation needs a strong, wise man to run it properly. When I was in college, I was somewhere between anarcho-environmentalist and egalitarian. When I was a volunteer in Central Africa, I was a libertarian and staunch advocate of constitutional republics. And now, I think I can only really call myself an anarcho-capitalist. As time went on, I read more and more of what was out there, and then got to see much of it firsthand. This was especially true of Africa, where I saw central planning and all of its nonsensicality. By examining and meditating on the ideas myself, I could only come to the conclusion that the only government that can protect the individual is…none. But in meantime, I can certainly do everything to support reducing government to a small, constitutionally-constrained weakling here in the US.

      I’d add that the internet has a great deal to do with attracting young minds. When I read political philosophy in high school, most everything I read came from libraries and Amazon. Even though I grew up with the internet, I didn’t really know what was out there. Since then, it’s easier than ever to get your hands on a variety of otherwise unpopular or random pieces of information. Liberty may not be the mainstream idea of our day but there is certainly a plethora of liberty-based writings available now compared to even a few years ago.

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