Libertarianism and conspiracy theories

You must be logged in to create new topics.

Libertarianism and conspiracy theories

Tags:
  • Ricky Peter Newins

    What is you take on the relationship between Libertarianism and conspiracy theories?

    You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

    • Mike Vroman

      If we want to discuss them amongst ourselves, that is good. Focusing on them as a public argument, though, is likely to cause people to view one as a crazy nut job, and even if the conspiracy is real, this impression means that not only will people not listen to talk of it, but they will tune out everything else as well.

      I prefer to try to find the better alternative than to support what is seen to empower the conspiracists, and focus on positively supporting that, giving people something better to hope for that will also cause the conspiracy to fail.

      You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

    • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      Sarah Meyer

      Conspiracy theories can be outlandish – streeeetching leaps of logic, or they can be quite plainly obvious. Isn’t Libertarianism by it’s own definition the epitome of conspiracy theory? I mean… the government conspires to hurt us. Wouldn’t most statists find that position pretty radical?

      You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

        Dave Burns

        Alternative version requiring no conspiracy is the invisible foot/spontaneous disorder of the state: the government bureaucrats and officials are doing their best, but the system is so broken (bad incentives, lack of knowledge, cognitive biases) it matters not. Think of your favorite example of a corrupt control freak, and I guarantee that person has a million justifications and excuses why that was the best anyone could do and its not his/her fault, and it was for the common good, bla bla bla. Take off the market constraints, give people power, and that is what you get.

        You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

        • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

          Sarah Meyer

          Hmm, interesting alternative… one that doesn’t make sense to me though, but would probably make a lot of sense to statists – so I’m thinking that probably only strengthens my idea that a libertarian is labeled as a conspiracy theorist by the statists. In my particular brand of logic and reason, I tend to sway towards which makes more sense:  That things turn to shit spontaneously, yet somehow every single time; or that the things turn to shit because the players in charge enjoy sitting on top of a pile of shit. (please pardon the language)

          You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

          • Dave Burns

            The magic ingredient in the market is voluntary cooperation. The magic ingredient in state corruption is coercion, plus some human psychology (cognitive dissonance, confirmation bias, etc.). Abra cadabra!

            You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

            • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      Audo

      Let’s first define the term. Here is what it used to mean:

      “two or more people getting together to plot an illegal, secret, or immoral action”

      After the Kennedy assasination the term has been used to ridicule people. I.e. it is used as a counter to the argument by attacking the person. Now the term is defined as follows:

      “a theory that explains an event or set of circumstances as the result of a secret plot by usually powerful conspirators.”

      or

      “the idea that many important political events or economic and social trends are the products of secret plots that are largely unknown to the general public.”

      In other words, a theory that is approved by the government is a historical fact and if not, then it’s a conspiracy theory.

      I think the term is only good as a tool of ridicule. I don’t see any valid use for it. The problem with the term is that it groups every kind of conspiracy imagined under it. I can’t say I believe in conspiracy theories, even though I believe in some conspiracy theories. If I’m asked about conspiracy theories, I get confused because I don’t know what specific theories they are referring to.

      To answer the question I would say that since libertarians generally question the government on every level some of those ‘conspiracy theories’ are part of it.

       

      You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

    • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      PG (Pierre-Guy) Veer

      Something is a conspiracy theory when it uses anecdotes, puts them together and point towards something evil/illegal: birthers, truthers, fake moon landing…

      When it’s proven beyond reasonable doubt (Fed inflation, bubbles, police state), then it’s fact and stops being a conspiracy

      You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

        Dave Burns

        When they admit it, it becomes conspiracy fact, not conspiracy theory.

        You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

        • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      Sean Ridlon

      In my view folks concerned about lizard people and Sumerian outer space monkey humpers are pretty far out there but Worrying about what government has been doing to people hardly counts as conspiracy theories.

      Most westerners are conspiracy theorists. Many believe 9/11 attacks were a conspiracy of Saudi nationals working for a shadow terrorist cell of an untraceable agency.

      Many westerners also believe the Bible is a realistic historical.account of certain events: but how many do you see marching aroUnd churches with signs proclaiming “the crucifixion was an inside job”?

      Popular theories are still conspiracy theories.

      You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

    • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      Michael Bunch

      I think the skeptical nature of libertarians tends to draw some to conspiracy theories. If you’re a libertarian, chances are you’re skeptical about government. That’s what draws people into the movement and makes them read about classical liberalism. It also is worth noting that some conspiracies, regarding government, tend to be true later on. It’s just some people get drawn in, for whatever reason, to more unusual conspiracies along the way, like Freemasons seeking world domination through having dinner together or whatever the cool thing is nowadays. The great tool for countering this is open dialog and friendly debate within libertarian groups as  whole, to prevent the good-but-misled ones from pushing themselves out of the movement in some reactionary anger.

      You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

    • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      starrychloe

      You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Viewing 6 reply threads