Micro-Aggressions

You must be logged in to create new topics.

Micro-Aggressions

  • Tyler Lloyd

    Do Micro-Aggressions violate the NAP?  It seems like thought control to me, but I’ve always got away from people who give me a weird vibe.

    You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

    • Michael Bunch

      I don’t see how it would. From my understanding, “micro-aggressions”, if they exist at all, wouldn’t constitute a form of coercive force. Furthermore, I don’t think it would be possible to prove that such coercion took place for the sake of tort law or some form of restitution.

      You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

    • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      Properal

      If they violate the NAP, you must consider what is the remedy?

      If a child steps on a neighbors lawn when waiting for the bus.  How is this  Micro-Aggression remedied?

      Should the child be shot?

      Rothbard had a theory of proportionality so that responding to aggression with more force than is necessary would be an act of aggression.

      When I consider Rothbard concept of proportionality, I think their are some small aggressions like accidentally stepping on a neighbors lawn, in which there is no amount of force that is justifiable to respond with , because any use of force would be more likely to injure the micro aggressor beyond proportion.

      You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

        Michael Bunch

        Personally I’m a fan of the wergild system. And I cannot see how micro-aggression is real or how it would work with something like wergild. For example, from the heart of social justice warriors:

        “Too bad about all the damn Cubans down there.”
        My boyfriend’s family friend to my boyfriend and me, about Miami. I am half-Cuban with a clearly [email protected] name, and we were in Miami to visit my father and grandfather, both Cuban immigrants.

        http://tmblr.co/ZKxVWy1Thgivq

        This is apparently a micro-aggression. So what would the fine be? Who would be liable? How could it be proven? Indeed, how can you prove that your being offended is an act of aggression that produces measurable harm? I think it’s all nonsense.

         

        You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

        • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

          Properal

          I had not known that is what people where calling micro-aggression.

          I think that is more of a micro-inequity.

          You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

          • Michael Bunch

            Microaggression theory is a social theory that describes social exchanges in which a member of a dominant culture says or does something, often accidentally, and without intended malice, that belittles and alienates a member of a marginalized group.

            Psychiatrist and Harvard University professor Chester M. Pierce coined the word microaggression in 1970 to describe insults and dismissals he said he had regularly witnessed non-black Americans inflict on black people.[1][2][3][4] In 1973, MIT economist Mary Rowe extended the term to include similar aggressions directed at women; eventually, the term came to encompass the casual degradation of any socially marginalized group, such as poor people, disabled people and sexual minorities.[5]

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microaggression_theory

            Generally this is what social justice warriors refer to when they discuss micro-aggression…which, really, is just a fancy way of calling someone rude.

            You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

          • Properal

             

            Thank you for the background.

            Untill now I was blissfully ignorant about the term micro aggressions.

            You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

            • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      Properal

      Wrong place, moved comment

      You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

    • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

      Tyler Lloyd

      I don’t think it does, and the people I know who would make that claim (of it violating the NAP) probably feels violated by someone looks at them or if a stranger tries to start a conversation.  I feel the hostility is pretty one sided, and people should be empowered enough to address “rudeness” without calling it an aggression.

      You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Viewing 3 reply threads