Independent Food Production

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Independent Food Production

  • Renier Maritz

    I have two large raised beds and have successfully grown a lot of vegies.  I’m wondering how much space would be required to grow enough food to feed two people?  Anyone here grow all their own food?

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    • Toni Sopocko

      The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible by Edward Smith is a very good book for the small gardener.  I highly recommend it.

      At this point, I only have two small raised beds also, and am very limited in what I can grow here in my shady part of Tahoe.  It’s a learning experience!

      Good luck to you!

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      Roger Browne

      Reiner, the amount of land needed varies greatly depending on your soil type and climatic zone, whether you are raising your meat too or just growing fruit and vegetables, and whether you also need to grow enough to trade with others for the things you cannot grow locally.

      The range of figures quoted usually runs from 0.1 to 5 acres per person. A google search for acres per person self-sufficient leads to some interesting pages.

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      Renier Maritz

      I’ve given this some more thought and given the yield I get on my very productive vegie beds, I think in Brisbane it should be possible to feed a person independently with about 650 m2 of land. Considering that I don’t focus on growing staples in my vegie garden, I don’t think it is impossible to achieve this goal with even less. I think I’m going to Launch a project and see if I can increase the size of my vegie garden and get to a month worth of self sufficiency. Pity I don’t own the land I’m living on. Sure my Landlord will be a bit miffed if I was to plow up his beautiful rolling lawns.

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      Kathy Grable

      If space is at a premium, you might want to think about supplementing your diet with sprouts. They are hugely nutritious and don’t require a lot of space,great for winter. Since we are finding out grains aren’t all that good for us, alternate “staples” can be considered. A lot of potatoes can be grown in a vertical arrangement in old tires or just a mound (if you have the space) by continuing to add straw, soil, etc as the potato plant grows, encouraging tuber formation along the covered part of the plant. An old book, “The Have-More Plan” by the Robinson’s gives some interesting plans for layout of a small property and growing your own food. Rabbits don’t take up much space, are very prolific, and are economical sources of protein and manure. They love dandelions and other yard “weeds”. Chickens are great as well. They will tear up the yard if left free range…but they’ll eat bugs and ticks, etc. They can be confined in moveable “chicken tractors”. You don’t need too many to get a lot of eggs. Countryside magazine and Backwoods Home magazine are good sources. Mother Earth News site can be good, but full of leftist propaganda.

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        John Martinez

        Just a quick subquestion

        “Since we are finding out grains aren’t all that good for us”

        What are your sources for this? I read a blog post by Tim Ferris explaining the issues grains can cause but it is all I have read on the matter. Do you have any references off the top of your head you could offer? It would be appreciated.

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        Kathy Grable

        I like “Marks Daily Apple” website. The idea is that people should eat like cavemen, thus the “Paleo” descriptor for the diet. People eveolved eating meat and berries, vegetation they found. Agriculture came later, and things like wheat became staples, but they are not as easily digested, because we weren’t eveolved to function optimally on them. The USDA food pyramid has taught people to eat carbs for decades and health has generally declined with heart disease and diabetes exploding. Carbs stimulate insulin production which converts sugars in the carbs to fat. The culprit in all of this is the carb-heavy diet that leads to insulin resistance and fat storage. Saturated fats are not unhealthy (chemical transfats ARE), butter, animal fats, red meat, these things are good for us. Also, increasingly, people are finding that strange skin symptoms and autoimmune and gastro-intestinal issues go away when people stop eating wheat. Corn and soy are heavily GMO, wheat has been hybridized to the point it is not anything like what our ancestors ate. I went low carb, high fat and meat and dropped about 40 lbs without feeling deprived. The “Food Renegade” site is good as well.

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          Dawn Hoff

          So the food renegade is what? “Real Food” – bc. it isn’t paleo as far as I can see?

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