are liberal punk kids delusional?

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are liberal punk kids delusional?

  • Richard Masta

    I’m listening to an old (lol, mid-2000’s) Bostonish band called Witches With Dicks and I’m having all sort of thoughts. People likened this band to Screeching Weasel and Crimpshrine. The “lead” singer started a zine in Boston called Wet Cement, which is influenced by Cometbus, no doubt. It’s all fun and I love it.

     

    Today I was driving through Dover, NH, the hipster metropolis of Nh, and thought I saw my friend. Long hair, shitty black jeans, convenience store fare in his hands. Then he turned his head. Nope, just another gauged-ear burned out hipster trying to walk home to his overpriced rent room.

    Listening to WWD, who actually sort of got it. I want to pump my fists at the one or two lines I actually can hear. We are punk kids being miserable! Woo! Are they just selling to the crowd or are they being one of us? This is an interesting question to ask every punk kid with a stupid patched jacket. Are you original? or just wishing you were original. Thoughts?

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  • Paddy Harrington

    Having come from the Boston scene of the mid/late 80’s and early 90’s, it was uncool to be a punk/skin, no matter where you were. The prep and jock culture was the order of the day and if you didn’t fit in, you got a lot of shit dumped on you. So while there were certainly poseurs and “clockwork skins”, you had to really want to be treated like a second class person to want to be part of it.

    I think it was around the time I was getting out of the scene when pop-punk came into mainstream again. Some people blame Green Day, I blame the Mighty Mighty Bosstones. Used to love them and they sang of that attitude of the Boston scene, mixing punk and ska quite well. But money called and they set the plaid aside and jumped into the “Hot Topic” fray. It all went downhill from there. In came the flood who wanted to dress the part and be part of the ‘ring-around-the-rosey-pit’, but the sounds of something like Sam Black Church or Slapshot made them cringe and a violent pit from bands like Fear or Sheer Terror had them running for the door.

    Now? I look at it all with disdain. Some of it could be that I’m older and have the grumpy old man attitude of “Back in my day, you weren’t really in a pit unless you caught a boot to the face two or three times.” But I think some is seeings kids in neighborhoods like where I live now (it’s a long ways away from bad) with Misfits shirts on and thinking “Did you buy that shirt or did Mom and Dad? And do you even know who The Misfits are?”

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    Chip Marce

    Well, back when I was a young feller, we knew what punk was!  Not like these young whippersnappers.  They wouldn’t know a mosh pit if it bit em on the ass!  Green day? Bah. Wouldn’t last five minutes back then.

    Now hand me my walker, sonny.  I need to go put some grecian formula in my mohawk.

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