Sifting for the truth

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Sifting for the truth

  • David Miller

    This week’s question for the Book Hangout comes out of a conversation that I was having with B.K. Marcus. It is about an experience that I think is common among Libertarians, in particular, and people who question mainstream perceptions of ethics, economics and politics in general.

    ”To what extent can you enjoy and profit from reading a book that diverges radically from your views on ethics, politics, economics, and liberty? What strategies do you use to filter the wheat from the chaff as you read a book that makes some good points, but is written from a world view that you do not share?” I suppose that is two questions, but I’m really curious to hear what you think about each of them. Please bring your experience and ideas to our discussion in the Bookworm Hangout: http://liberty.me/bookworm-hangout/ at 8 PM ET.

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  • Mike Reid

    Wonderful! Thanks, David. I’m looking forward to it. I came into libertarianism out of leftist anthropology and still find that I still enjoy anthropological anecdotes even if I have to skip the theorizing.

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    Daniel Burke

    Mr. Miller, I find it hard to read books when I realize that the author’s foundational ideas are obvious garbage. I began to read John Rawls’ theory of justice but had to lay it down when I realized that his foundation of justice required human beings such as never had existed. I suppose that this is due to my reliance on the Bible’s doctrine concerning Man’s nature. I did try, though. Really, I did!

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