Jeffrey Tucker Interviews Bretigne Shaffer With Jeffrey Tucker

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  • Profile photo of B.K. Marcus B.K. Marcus

    Comic Books

    During last week’s Bookworm Hangout, someone recommended author Neil Gaiman’s The Ocean at the End of the Lane. I haven’t read it, but I’m an ardent Neil Gaiman fan and always will be even if I read none of his novels, because of the Sandman comic book series he wrote from 1989 to 1996. I think Sandman is one of the greatest stories I’ve ever read in any medium. My guess is that people don’t generally think of comic books (or even “graphic novels”) when we ask what they’re reading or what books they’d recommend, but why not? I think writers like Gaiman, Frank Miller, and Alan Moore deserve to be recognized as great authors. I haven’t read any comics by Grant Morrison, but his book Supergods: What Masked Vigilantes, Miraculous Mutants, and a Sun God from Smallville Can Teach Us About Being Human is extremely well written. And also fascinating. And also really, really weird. (I recommend it.) What comic books or graphic novels do you love? BK PS I heard someone say last week, “Liberty needs more funny.” We’ve all heard how much we need more art and music and popular culture to balance out all the serious intellectual content of our tradition. Does liberty need more comic books? What are the comics we already have? PPS Usual reminder: Bookworm Hangout is every Wednesday night at 8 Eastern. All welcome. Hope to see you there! bookworms.liberty.me

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  • Profile photo of Todd Baker Todd Baker

    Comic Books

    Anybody reading any new comic books? Every Wednesday new comic books get released. I’m curious if any of you are picking some up. Right now I’m reading Sheriff of Babylon, Southern Bastards, Kaijumax, I Hate Fairyland, Black Road, Dept. H, Mirror, and Star Trek.

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  • Profile photo of E. Lee MacFall E. Lee MacFall

    Has any serious work been done on non-violent resolutions to violent situations?

    Usually when people talk about free market defense, they talk about how to sell defensive force as a commodity. And while I believe that defensive force is justified, I don’t believe it’s the best way to resolve disputes. Obviously the purpose of DROs would be to resolve disputes without escalating to force. But what about emergent scenarios where violence is already happening? Sure, you can go in with guns blazing, and as long as you only shoot the aggressors, NAP says you’re fine. But I’m interested in talking about ways in which violent situations can be deescalated, and threats neutralized without people getting shot. Does anyone know of any serious theory, or better yet, real-life experimentation with this?

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  • Profile photo of B.K. Marcus B.K. Marcus

    Batman!

    I asked about your favorite comic books (and expected a flood of replies!), but I forgot to mention what may be the most important comic book in our tradition. Yesterday, the Libertarian Liquidationist reminded us of THE comic book for libertarians: The Berlin Batman, in which an alternate-history version of the Dark Knight tries to foil the Nazi’s confiscation of Ludwig von Mises’s papers. I learned about this post because the LL includes a link to an old blog post of mine, in which I quote Brian Doherty and link to Paul Cantor on this perfect storm of pop culture and Austrolibertarian history.

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Description

Jeffrey Tucker chats with Bretigne Shaffer, the creator of “Urban Yogini,” a new comic book about a superhero who can’t use violence.

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