Liberty Classics: Resist Not Evil by Clarence Darrow With Jeffrey Tucker

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  •  B.K. Marcus

    25 Life-Changing Classics of Liberty

    25 Life-Changing Classics There are books that change your life — the kind you try to get all your friends to read as soon as you’re finished (or sooner). Here Jeffrey Tucker lists 25 such books, classics of liberty: fiction, history, economics, philosophy. And each book-specific chapter links to your free copy of the book in the Liberty.me Library. (And look for Jeffrey’s 25-week course on these classics at Liberty.me U!) Questions, comments, observations or elaborations? Either reply here or create a new discussion using the tag Library_25-life-changing-classics

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  •  Jeffrey Tucker

    The Rise and Fall of Society

    The Rise and Fall of Society This book is one of the best expositions of economics and politics ever written. It was Chodorov’s last book and the one most overlooked. It’s tragic. It’s great. It explains central economic ideas from the Austrian tradition, and offers up a highly sophisticated theory of the state and its operations. It is one of the books that cannot be overlooked. Kick off the discussion! Questions, comments, observations or elaborations? Either reply here or create a new discussion using the tag Library_The Rise and Fall of Society

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  •  Jeffrey Tucker

    Resist Not Evil

    Resist Not Evil Fair warning: this book is extremely unsettling. It will shake you fundamentally. You will never look at judges, police, courts, and jails the same way. It could change your whole outlook on politics — permanently. And remember: this was written 100 years ago. How much more true is all the contents today? An incredible and challenging work. Kick off the discussion! Questions, comments, observations or elaborations? Either reply here or create a new discussion using the tag Library_Resist Not Evil

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  •  B.K. Marcus

    Whence the State?

    I’m just reading Clarence Darrow’s 1902 book Resist Not Evil for the first time. The first chapter is a powerful opening, but Darrow seems to imagine a different origin for the state than we learn from the tradition of Oppenheimer, Nock, Chodorov, and Rothbard. For Darrow, the state begins when a local thug takes over his tribe. Whereas, if I recall correctly, for Oppenheimer, et al., the state begins when a tribe of nomads has been raiding a settled group for a while, then decides to settle in with them and become a ruling class over the conquered people. (This, by the way, is also the version of events described by the socialist utopian H.G. Wells in his Short History of the World (1922) — where, a little surprisingly, he sees the invaders as injecting some virility into the stagnant culture of the conquered people. An unexpected interpretation from a pacifist. Is Darrow just speculating, or were there competing theories at the time? And are there competing theories now? In Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond describes states as beginning when a settled group has a centralized and unmovable source of surplus wealth, making it easier for a “kleptocratic” takeover. I can’t recall however if he distinguishes between local thugs and outside invaders becoming the kleptocratic class. Anyone able to update us on current theories of the state’s origins? @lawrencereed @srichman @berserkrl @bobhiggs @anthonygregory @riggenbach @jacobhuebert @albertlu @thomasmichie @mattgilliland (Who am I forgetting to ask?)

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Description

This remarkable book is the most comprehensive, sweeping, compelling, and unsettling case ever penned against what is laughingly called the “criminal justice” system. It is a classic, devastating at its core, that is made newly available to speak to us in our times in which the state is completely out of control.

Clarence Darrow is best known today as the Chicago lawyer who defended John T. Scopes in the Scopes Monkey Trial in 1925. But that case actually played a minor role in his life. He was an attorney by training who, from experience, learned that the entire state apparatus of courts, trials, and prisons was the worst single feature of the state. He saw the entire machinery as a gigantic fraud, a purveyor of injustice, a producer of criminality itself, as has noted by many in the legal treatment of the Eric Garner murder.

Join Jeffrey Tucker on December 28th at 8pm EST for this session in our Liberty Classics series. Jeffrey Tucker will guide you, week by week, through 25 of the most important works in the classical liberal and libertarian tradition, all of which are available free with your subscription to Liberty.me!

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