Liberty Classics: The Use of Knowledge in Society by F.A. Hayek With Jeffrey Tucker

Related Discussions

  •  B.K. Marcus

    25 Life-Changing Classics of Liberty

    25 Life-Changing Classics There are books that change your life — the kind you try to get all your friends to read as soon as you’re finished (or sooner). Here Jeffrey Tucker lists 25 such books, classics of liberty: fiction, history, economics, philosophy. And each book-specific chapter links to your free copy of the book in the Liberty.me Library. (And look for Jeffrey’s 25-week course on these classics at Liberty.me U!) Questions, comments, observations or elaborations? Either reply here or create a new discussion using the tag Library_25-life-changing-classics

    Jump to Discussion Post 6 replies
  •  Michael R. E. Sanders

    Fascism is just another form of socialism

    Jeffrey Tucker wrote in pertinent part “You can choose the socialist who wants to wreck the world in one way, or the fascist who wants to wreck the world in another way.” Since fascism is just another form of socialism, is Mr. Tucker arguing  “you can choose the socialist who wants to wreck the world in one way, or the socialist who wants to wreck the world in another way?

    Jump to Discussion Post 36 replies
  •  Jeffrey Tucker

    The Rise and Fall of Society

    The Rise and Fall of Society This book is one of the best expositions of economics and politics ever written. It was Chodorov’s last book and the one most overlooked. It’s tragic. It’s great. It explains central economic ideas from the Austrian tradition, and offers up a highly sophisticated theory of the state and its operations. It is one of the books that cannot be overlooked. Kick off the discussion! Questions, comments, observations or elaborations? Either reply here or create a new discussion using the tag Library_The Rise and Fall of Society

    Jump to Discussion Post 6 replies
  •  Bruce Koerber

    How Extensive Is The Depravity In Socialism?

    A key point made by Fredrich Hayek in The University of Chicago Law Review (Spring 1949) is when he refers to the philosopher as the prince of the intellectuals. To understand this we have to separate ourselves from socialism. A philosopher within socialism is functionally no more (due to its incongruence with the human spirit) a prince than any other socialist, just a more decorated one. For Hayek’s statement to be true – ‘a philosopher is the prince of the intellectuals’ – there has to be freedom of the human spirit. The entrepreneurial spirit that is alert to human potential will tend to be philosophic. Here is an analogy: Entrepreneurs are alert to the human needs and the resources necessary to meet those needs – they are the driving force of the economy. In like manner philosophers alert to human potential lay the groundwork necessary for the advancement of civilization. Business people of all facets of commerce dutifully compete to get what the entrepreneurs discovered and all products and services to the consumers. In like manner the intellectuals diligently find ways to distribute this new philosophic information and information in general to human minds. Socialism is not only a system of depravity economically but ineludibly it is a system of shackled intellectual and philosophic expressiveness.

    Jump to Discussion Post 0 replies
  •  starrychloe

    The Road to Serfdom, In Cartoons

    http://imgur.com/a/y0d33

    Jump to Discussion Post 3 replies

Description

Knowledge is a good, perhaps the most important good, something vastly more important than all physical property combined. It is the driving force of history, the immortal, sharable, reproducible, malleable substance that has built our world and makes possible the forward motion of history. This essay shows why it is not possible for this knowledge to be produced or used by centralized agents in the civic order; rather, knowledge must be generated, extracted, and put to use by real actors using real property and interacting with the world around them. Social complexity grows organically from experience of time and place, and this can never be produced from the outside regardless of the supposed intelligence of the the planning class. Tune in to Liberty.me LIVE Sunday, September 21st at 8pm EDT to join Jeffrey Tucker in exploring this brilliant essay.

See More See Less