Panel: Monetary Policy, What is It Good For? With David Rapp, Jeffrey Herbener and Shawn Ritenour

Related Discussions

  •  Anonymous

    Hidden Secrets of Money Series

    http://hiddensecretsofmoney.com/ Mike Maloney has a great series of videos that summarizes the history of money and banking on this website. The media provided serves as great companion material for his book.

    Jump to Discussion Post 1 reply
  •  Luke Avedon

    How is Seigniorage calculated?

    Hello, I’ve become quite keen on Jeffrey Rogers Hummel views on inflation. https://fee.org/articles/governments-diminishing-benefits-from-inflation/ That governments don’t get as much cash money as they used to from Seigniorage(money printing)…becuase of some details of the modern banking system. Hummels view is that the US Gov is more likely to actually default on it’s bonds than print it’s way out of it’s financial problems as so many of us libertairans often predict. Any way…. how are people actually calculating the revenue states are getting from seigniorage? There is constant mention to specific statistics in his works on what revenue governments make from printing money…but how are economists attempting to calculate this so exactly? “Almost none of the developed countries could boast seigniorage amounting to more than 1 percent of GDP, despite the fact that the study incorporated the inflationary years of the 1970s. Joseph H. Haslag’s smaller sample of 67 countries over a longer period, 1965 to 1994, finds that seigniorage averaged about 2 percent of total output for the entire sample, ranging from as low as 0.25 percent to as high as 9.98 percent (for Ghana).” However, I’m not smart enough to figure out how this is being calculated? When I Google — I see Seignoarge defined as the cost to money vs what the money is worth. (if it costs 1cent to print a dollar bill than Seigorage is 99cents). Pennies have negative seigniorage — cost the Gov more to mint than 1 cent.) But for the point Hummel is making it seems like a more sophisticated calculation? How did people figure out that for example in WW2 seignorage was 6%? Perhaps this is rather obvious? Thanks! –Luke

    Jump to Discussion Post 2 replies
  •  Martin Nicholls
  •  Alex Merced

Description

Liberty.me is proud and excited to present the International Conference of Prices and Markets, livestreaming only on Liberty.me LIVE! The International Conference of Prices & Markets  is designed to combine the opportunities of a professional meeting, with the added attraction of hearing and presenting new and innovative research, engaging in vigorous debate, and interacting with like-minded scholars who share research interests.

Panelists:

Jeffrey Herbener, Grove City College, “Monetary Policy Mistakes of 1937”

Shawn Ritenour, Grove City College, “NGDP Targeting: Macroeconomic Panacea?”

David Rapp, Grove City College, “The Role of Business Valuation in the Recent Financial Crisis”

See More See Less