Rethinking Higher Education with Isaac Morehouse With Isaac Morehouse

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  •  Jeffrey Tucker

    Education: Free and Compulsory

    Education: Free and Compulsory Murray Rothbard explained the significance of home schooling before it was fashionable. He goes over the history and argues that the ideal educational is private tutorial. I wonder if he is fully right about this, since, after all, one of the main criticisms of home schooling is the reduced opportunities for socialization. I’ve never taken that criticism seriously but it does remain true that there is a strong market demand for group-based schooling, even within the homeschool community. Kick off the discussion! Questions, comments, observations or elaborations? Either reply here or create a new discussion using the tag Library_Education

    Jump to Discussion Post 7 replies
  •  Ethan Glover

    What does college mean today?

    I’m a computer science major (payed for by the GI bill, the only thing I got out of the military) and in my second year. In two years I have only taken a grand total of 3 CS (Computer Science) classes. What I have taken is a lot of Gen. Ed., learn to love the country classes like American Government, American Literature, American History, etc.. I see a lot of computer companies (both development and design) that pay no mind to degrees. They want to see portfolios, freelance work, internships, GitHub profiles, things of that sort. But I’m not getting that out of college. What I have got is a partial structure, an understanding of what I need to learn that you won’t find on the hundreds of websites out there that purport to “teach programming”. (They don’t.)  However, it’s very slow going and doing small programs to prove concepts isn’t impressive to employers. I have plans for a site that takes teaching programming seriously and goes far beyond the throwaways like Codecademy and (ick) “The New Boston”.  The problem is the cost and time. (Most of my time is currently dedicated to keeping up with calculus.) I was actually in talks with a design company for stage one development that might give me a jumping point so that I could start posting what curriculum I’ve written. No luck, in the end, they decided my budget was not good enough. =/ But I digress. Here’s what I’m getting at. Many people within the liberty movement have an interest in computers or have jobs related to them. (I’ve met many programmers and developers who subscribe to liberty.) Here’s the questions for your consideration: Did you attend a college or university? Did you get a degree or drop out? If not, do you feel like you could do better with a degree? If so, do you feel like it was a valuable use of your time and money? What would you say to someone who struggles to keep up with keeping their grades up and using what little free time they have to actually learn something? Note: This is my first post to Liberty.me, it’s not meant to be well structured, it’s just something for consideration and discussion. 🙂  

    Jump to Discussion Post 13 replies
  •  B.K. Marcus

    The Secular Homeschooler

    The Secular Homeschooler by Teri P. Moore A Nonreligious Guide for Helping Kids Build Competence, Independence and Ethics Outside of a School Environment (This book will be free to Liberty.me members in the month of July.) Kick off the discussion! Questions, comments, observations or elaborations? Either reply here or create a new discussion using the tag Library_the-secular-homeschooler

    Jump to Discussion Post 10 replies
  •  Mike Avi

    Secular Student Events

    Hey, so I will be co-president of my university’s libertarian group and president of the secular student alliance next year. Aside from a separation of church and state event, what might be a cool event or presentation to do that could help members of either group learn more about the other? Note: a large number of our campus’ libertarians are non-religious and a large number of our secular student group members (Secular Student Alliance) are socially left and economically all over the place.

    Jump to Discussion Post 1 reply
  •  Moritz Bierling

    Alternative Education Options

    I’ve started to notice more and more private education companies being founded that offer alternatives to the established education system. So far I know of the following: The UnCollege Gap Year: “A 12-month skills-building regimen designed to equip young adults to succeed in the 21st century.” Praxis: “An intensive 10-month program for entrepreneurial young people who want real-world career experience and the best of online education all in one.” Exosphere‘s Entrepreneurship Boot Camps: “An 8-week program at Exosphere’s headquarters in Chile for people who are committed to setting their lives on a new course, combining technical skill acquisition, real business practice, and deep philosophical and intellectual reflection.” I myself work at Exosphere and we’re noticing how more and more people become interested in these alternative programs. What other options are out there that I’m missing?

    Jump to Discussion Post 2 replies

Description

Is college actually something worth pursuing, or is it an overpriced, time-wasting experience? Are there alternatives to modern college education that actually educate, empower, and prepare students for the world? Isaac Morehouse offers potentially life-changing ideas.

Join Isaac Thursday, July 31st at 8pm EDT to discuss this path-breaking idea.

Make sure you also check out Isaac’s Liberty.me guide, Rethinking Higher Education!

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