The Man of the Century: Mises and His Works, Session #2 with Jeffrey Tucker With Jeffrey Tucker

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  •  Jeffrey Tucker

    Socialism

    Socialism This is it! The treatise that stopped an intellectual movement in its tracks. There is so much in here, so much richness of theory and history and analysis. How is it possible that Mises’s Socialism would have lost none of its power after 90 years? That’s the mark of brilliance. Even now, the book amounts to a scientific but searing attack on nearly every political ideology except that which grants people the right to use their property as they see fit. Kick off the discussion! Questions, comments, observations or elaborations? Either reply here or create a new discussion using the tag Library_Socialism

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  •  Properal

    Dominance, Sharing, and Privacy (DSP), The Three Principles of Sociality

    Dominance, Sharing, and Privacy gives us a simplified (maybe oversimplified), and intuitive way to categorize human sociality. Instead of thinking of social structures as being diverse and too complicated to be categorized, these three categories allow us to classify behaviors that address conflict as one of three types or a combination of the three.  For example, might makes right is not really a property norm but it is a dominance strategy. The ethic that the world belongs to everyone is not an alternative property norm, it is the nullification of property in favor of a sharing norm.  The violent defense of a territory is not a might makes right or dominance behavior but is the defense of privacy. The reluctance to intrude on others prior establish territory is not just a fear of retaliation but a respect for privacy.   For moe read: Dominance, Sharing, and Privacy (DSP), The Three Principles of Sociality  

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  •  Mike Maman

    What If Parents Loved Strangers’ Children As Much As Their Own?

    What if Parents Loved Strangers’ Children As Much As Their Own? Last December, the author and philosopher Sam Harris invited Paul Bloom, a professor of psychology at Yale, to appear on his podcast, “Waking Up.” It was Bloom’s third stint as a guest, and, as before, the two men devoted a significant portion of their conversation to the subject of empathy. Bloom had just published a book, “Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion,” in which he drew a distinction between empathy (the ability to feel other people’s pain) and compassion (desiring others’ well-being); according to Bloom, society needs less of the former and more of the latter. On the podcast, he and Harris talked about how empathy favors people you know over people you don’t, and how this favoritism leads to harmful behaviors such as tribalism and nationalism. They advocated a cooler, more rational approach to moral decision-making. Then they asked how far such an approach could be taken. Some forms of preferential treatment, Harris and Bloom noted, are considered appropriate, as when parents love their children more than they do strangers. But they wondered whether this, too, might be a behavior that requires correcting. They cited the utilitarian philosopher Peter Singer, who famously pointed out that spending money on non-essentials means valuing your comfort over the lives of people starving elsewhere in the world. Bloom admitted that he buys toys and vacations for his children, identifying this as a moral dilemma that we all face. He and Harris engaged in a thought experiment: Would the world be improved if parents cared for other people just as much as they cared for their own children…While we’ve seen some reversals of this in the past year or two—including Brexit, the election of Donald Trump, and the resurgence of the xenophobic right—it’s not unreasonable to believe that these are temporary setbacks, blips in a broader trend that obtains over centuries or millennia. If this trend continues in the future, it could end in a kind of species-wide eusociality, at which point the perfectly impartial affection that Harris and Bloom posit might no longer seem so outlandish.? At first glance, I rolled my eyes thinking this was a call for collective child-rearing and how individualism is evil (Although he does take swipes at Trump and Brexit).  However on the whole, Chiang’s piece for the New Yorker is surprisingly balanced, with the exception talking about Brexit and Trump, as he cites several examples like the Kibbutzim in Israel where collectively raising children was not a good thing.  How if we all adopted a guru mindset of impartial affection the world would not be a utopia. What are your thoughts? Reactions?

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  •  Rebecca Lau

    Dating a socialist

    I mean a real socialist, not a guy that voted for Obama. A guy that is every bit socialist as I am libertarian. Background: I met a guy on online. I found out that he is an engineer in SF and a socialist. He loves seeing socialist philosophers speak, Black Lives Matter demonstrations, and Tumblr. I’m also a SF resident and more knowledgable and more sympathetic toward the far left than most libertarians. I also have a job that is stereotypically liberal (elementary school teacher) so we’re kind of the opposite. We’ve hung out twice so far and I think we are pretty cute together. I always say teasing things to him like, “Do you follow fuckyeahelizabethwarren on Tumblr?” He doesn’t know much about libertarianism but when I met him I was going to see Jeffrey Tucker speak on the same day and he was interested to hear about it. Has anyone ever gone down this dark path before? Any predictions on what will happen?

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  •  Jon Trossbach

    Mises' Wikipedia Page

    https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ludwig_von_Mises&oldid=750642259 The Wikipedia page for Mises seems to be written from a bias perspective: someone with the right credentials or knowledge set should go change it. I’ve tried multiple times but had my submissions blocked or undone. Probably the most irksome line in the whole article is under “Contributions and Influence in Economics” where it concludes that among Mises’ students “only Israel Kirzner has achieved mainstream respectability among economists.”(02:39, 21 November 2016) It would be nice if someone could undo the bias on his Wikipedia page. Any Ideas for changes? Use this discussion to report back on what changes have been made and how smoothly your changes go.

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Description

Ludwig von Mises’ story is inspiring; he was an incredible and pathbreaking economist, a tireless defender of classical liberalism, and a tremendous influence on many economists both in his time and today. Jeffrey Tucker hosts this incredible 9-part series on the life and contributions of Mises Thursdays beginning September 18th at 2:30pm EDT right here on Liberty.me.

This installment of The Man of the Century will explore Mises’ work “Nation, State, and Economy.” Written following Mises’ service in World War I, it marked the beginning of his life-long assault on socialism and the warfare state. This book also marks the first time Mises advances his theory of secessionism, which would be a key component of his classical liberal minarchism throughout his career. Join Jeffrey Tucker to discuss this book and its indefatigable author Thursday, September 25th at 2:30pm ET.

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